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School year will end earlier at Maugansville, Pangborn

May 30 closures will allow teachers, staff more time to move into new buildings

May 30 closures will allow teachers, staff more time to move into new buildings

April 02, 2008|By ERIN CUNNINGHAM

WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Students at Maugansville and Pangborn elementary schools will start summer vacation a few days early.

The schools will close for students May 30 instead of June 4 to maintain construction schedules and allow time for teachers and staff to pack materials, furniture and records. Everything from both schools will be moved to larger replacement schools that are being built.

Other public schools in Washington County will end the school year June 4.

State Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick granted the school system's request for a waiver of the 180-day school year requirement for Maugansville and Pangborn elementary schools.

The new replacement schools for Maugansville and Pangborn will open in August, and everything must be moved from the old buildings before they are demolished in June, said Jill Burkhart, Director for Elementary Education.

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The new 85,336-square-foot Pangborn Elementary is expected to be substantially complete in June, and some materials may be moved to the new building at that time, officials have said. The new 91,500-square-foot Maugansville Elementary is expected to be substantially complete in mid-July, according to officials.

"There is so much that needs to be done to move from one building to another," she said.

Teachers will pack textbooks and other classroom materials into boxes, and desks, chairs and other furniture will have to be moved, Burkhart said.

One classroom's materials can fill more than 100 boxes, and Burkhart said it likely will take thousands of boxes to move materials from each school.

"Those three days really are needed," she said.

Burkhart said that teachers likely will alter their lesson plans to make up for the loss of those days.

"Teachers and staff will continue to provide effective instruction, with possible minor adjustments because of the schedule change, to ensure that all curricular expectations are met," Acting Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education Michael Markoe said.

Letters about the shortened school year went home with students Monday.

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