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New warehouse rises from the ashes in Waynesboro

Structure modeled after old firehouse

Structure modeled after old firehouse

February 21, 2008|By JENNIFER FITCH

WAYNESBORO, Pa. - "Rising from the ashes" is typically a clichd phrase, but one Waynesboro businessman did just that in 365 days with a building.

An early morning fire on Jan. 23, 2007, destroyed his warehouse, yet Chuck Morningstar found himself cutting a ribbon this Jan. 23 on a new structure modeled off the old firehouse that's now Waynesboro Borough Hall.

"I got great support from the community. ... It's really hard to even remember everybody who worked with us," said Morningstar, owner of Waynesboro Floor Covering.

Morningstar used the foundation at the site and opted to build a three-story structure this time. He used an exterior insulation finishing system sometimes called "synthetic stucco."

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"I couldn't figure out how to make the building attractive at first because it was practically all doors. Above my one desk in the store up there (on North Church Street), we have an old picture from the 1800s of the original firehouse in Waynesboro. I took that picture, and if you look at the picture, you'd understand how everything here is reminiscent of that building," Morningstar said.

The finishing touch will be a 25-foot flagpole on the top, he said.

The public parking lot that his warehouse faces also is set to get a makeover.

State Sen. Terry Punt, R-Franklin, announced last November that he secured a $76,175 grant to repave Rotary parking lot and create a walkway around the perimeter. The borough council said at the time that the parking lot behind West Main Street will be repaved with asphalt and painted similar to the South Mulberry Avenue walkway.

Punt recently said he's working to secure an additional $17,000 in grants for lights and further improvements to the parking lot.

Borough Manager Lloyd Hamberger said after the ribbon-cutting ceremony that the parking lot efforts might happen this summer.

Morningstar, whose business has 16 employees, estimated that he invested an extra $25,000 in the building's facade to make it more visually appealing than a traditional warehouse.

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