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Sit back, relax, take a deep breath

February 04, 2008|By TIFFANY ARNOLD

Once the massage begins, the nail polish color becomes incidental. Relaxation takes over.

Pedicures and manicures are as much about relaxation as they are about the aesthetics of having nice-looking nails, local nail technicians say.

For that reason, many spas that do pedicures and manicures are dropping products with stinky fumes, such as acrylic, for products with more pleasant scents.

Nothing kills the mood like a bad, bad smell.

"We do facial wraps, massages, all kind of stuff here," said Stephanie Payne, a cosmetologist at Serenity Day Spa and Salon in Martinsburg, W.Va. "We don't like that smell going all over the spa."

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Visitors at Tranquility Salon & Spa in Hagerstown soak their fingers in a bowl of scented oil and water during manicures, said Shellie Bayko, a hair, skin and nail technician at Tranquility.

"It's aromatherapy," Bayko said. "It's supposed to make you feel better."

There were plenty of good feelings and scents to go around during a recent visit to the two salons. Here's an idea of how things went.

 








Photos by Ric Dugan/Staff Photographer

Tabitha Lemus uses an exfoliant with ground walnut shells to slough off dead skin on client Anne Belota's feet and legs during a pedicure at Tranquility Salon & Spa in Hagerstown.




Debbie Stoner soaks her nails in a dish of warm water and aromatherapeutic oil, which softens the skin.




Tabitha Lemus applies a clear top coat to Debbie Stoner's nails at Tranquility Salon & Spa in Hagerstown.




Photos by Kevin G. Gilbert/Staff Photographer

Valerie Rinehart glances at Teal Cain, who gives her a manicure at Serenity Day Spa and Salon in Martinsburg, W.Va.




Teal Cain scoops a glob of pomegranate-lime sugar scrub in preparation for a pedicure massage at Serenity Day Spa and Salon in Martinsburg, W.Va.




Kristen Rinehart relaxes while receiving a pedicure at Serenity Day Spa and Salon in Martinsburg, W.Va. Danielle Edgecomb massaged the arch of the foot with her fist, not fingers, to avoid tickling the client.




Kristen Rinehart waits for her toes to dry. She and her mother, Valerie Rinehart, went to Serenity Day Spa and Salon in Martinsburg, W.Va., for pedicures and manicures.

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