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Renfrew student program receives financial boost

December 20, 2007

WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Cavetown Planing Mill Inc. of Cavetown has provided underwriting support for Renfrew Institute's Trail of Trees program.

Renfrew Institute for Cultural and Environmental Studies, a nonprofit educational organization, provides programs to area schoolchildren in environmental education and farm life of the 1800s.

Peggy Bushey, president of Cavetown Planing Mill, said she was glad to be a part of helping to fund Trail of Trees.

"As a company, we've always helped with community organizations like Little League, area schools and local fire departments," Bushey said. "Educational programs for children fit right in, and the Trail of Trees program really ties in with what we do."

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Cavetown Planing Mill has created quality custom woodwork for residential and commercial construction since 1881. With more than 100 years of experience in the art of master carpentry, the mill is quality-certified by the Architectural Woodwork Institute, and recognized for its outstanding craftsmanship and high standards.

The mill's exacting woodwork can be seen in such locations as the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the Washington County Courthouse, and projects include the award-winning National Cathedral Gatehouse, Alexandria Courthouse, and Walters Art Gallery.

During the two-hour Trail of Trees program, third-grade students are launched on a quest traveling the "trail of trees" in search of puppet character Old Hickory. Along the way, they learn about the structure and importance of trees.

Ecological, botanical, cultural and economic factors are considered as activities engage students in opportunities for drama and literature while tree science is revealed.

At each station along the trail, children collect letters for a secret word, which answers the question, "Are leaves important after they fall off the trees?" At the conclusion of the program, Old Hickory helps them discover that fallen leaves are an important ingredient in soil, and help nourish the trees from which they fall.

Nearly 10,000 student visits were recorded this year to institute programs. Facility support is provided courtesy of Renfrew Museum and Park. For more information, contact the institute at 717-762-0373.

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