Advertisement

United Way of Washington County director resigns

October 12, 2007|By ANDREW SHOTZ

Dan Greenwald has resigned as the executive director of United Way of Washington County after less than two months, the agency announced Friday.

For Greenwald, whose background was in for-profit businesses, running a nonprofit organization "just wasn't a good fit," said Trey Alter, president of the local United Way board.

Two messages left at Greenwald's home Friday were not returned.

His last day on the job was Friday. Alter said Greenwald notified the chapter of his decision several days ago.

The chapter probably will have to wait at least until early January to replace Greenwald, Alter said.

This is the heart of the annual fundraising season for United Way, an umbrella organization that funnels money to local charities.

Washington County's $1.9 million campaign kicked off Aug. 31 and is scheduled to run roughly until the end of the year.

Advertisement

Alter said he expects that the executive director position will be advertised with a salary range of between $65,000 and $80,000.

Greenwald was a national account manager for Chicago-based Chas. Levy Circulating Co.

As a volunteer, he helped raise money for other Washington County nonprofits and for Congregation B'nai Abraham, according to a Herald-Mail story published Aug. 23, the day after Greenwald started his United Way job.

He said at the time that in a previous job, he found himself spending more time traveling and less time with his family.

"I needed to make a life decision," he said then.

"Moving from the business world to the nonprofit arena can be challenging and is not the right fit for everyone," Alter said in a press release. "Dan realized it was not the right fit for him, and we certainly understand that. We give him credit for making the decision to maximize his strengths in another manner."

United Way of Washington County hired Greenwald after Dale Bannon, the last executive director, left at the end of June to work for Washington County Public Schools.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|