Advertisement

A historical tale that's juicy

October 09, 2007|By EVA NIESSNER / Pulse Correspondent

Book review

Many people know the story of Salome, a girl in the Bible whose sensual dance for her stepfather, Antipas, led to the death of John the Baptist, the cousin of Jesus.

According to the Bible story, after Salome danced, her stepfather told her she could have anything she wanted. Salome's mother urged her to ask for John's head on a plate. She did ask for John's head. Antipas did give it to her, and her story made history.

End of story?

Not according to author Beatrice Gormley, who retells the tale narrated by Salome herself. Gormley's story brings Salome to life as a princess with dreams and regrets, a pawn exploited by her ambitious mother and sexually preyed upon by the royal family of Herod. Salome faces betrayal, accusation and distrust. She is unable to trust anyone.

Advertisement

The narration itself is a little dull - it's written for ages 12 and older - and some of the family lines are difficult to keep track of. But the story is suspenseful enough to willingly keep a teenage audience. Even people who dislike reading Bible stories will find "Salome" interesting. Though the events are set in Biblical times, the story reads like historical fiction, not a religious, preachy call to repentance.

I would recommend Gormley's story to female teens who are fans of historical fiction.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|