Advertisement

Genealogical society here Saturday

National group chose Hagerstown for its Germanic roots

National group chose Hagerstown for its Germanic roots

October 04, 2007

Hagerstown will host 150 members of the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society for their annual fall meeting on Saturday.

The theme for the meeting is "Putting the Family Puzzle Together: Research and Writing."

The group is a genealogical society founded in 1982. Its mission is to stimulate and facilitate research on Germanic genealogy and heritage in the mid-Atlantic region and to promote genealogical research of Germanic ancestors who settled in the Mid-Atlantic Region in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

"We chose Hagerstown for its strong Germanic roots and because many persons of Germanic descent stopped in Hagerstown and the surrounding environs while on their way to the Shenandoah Valley and points south," said Diane Kuster, the group's registrar.

John P. Colletta, one of America's premier genealogical lecturers, is the guest speaker for the meeting. He conducts workshops for the National Archives and teaches courses for the Smithsonian Institution and local universities. He lectures nationally and is a faculty member of the Institute of Genealogy at Samford University in Alabama and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. His publications include two genealogical manuals and numerous articles. His latest book is "Only a Few Bones: A True Account of the Rolling Fork Tragedy and Its Aftermath."

Advertisement

Colletta will present several lectures on research, using federal records, uncovering the stories of immigrant ancestors, and researching Alsatian and Lorrainian families. Vendors will be on hand to sell books, software, and forms of interest to researchers throughout the day.

The meeting is at the Plaza Hotel. Previous meetings have been in Gettysburg, Pa., Bethlehem, Pa., and Bowie, Md.

"We frequently speak with visitors who have come to Hagerstown to trace their ancestry," said Betsy De Vore of the Convention and Visitors Bureau. "Visitors come to conduct research at the Miller House and Washington County Historical Society, the Western Maryland Room at the Washington County Free Library and even at Rose Hill Cemetery."

The group has approximately 500 members, mostly from the Mid-Atlantic region, though membership does span nationwide.

For more information about the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society, visit www.magsgen.com

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|