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It's all about the community at the Quincy Ox Roast

September 01, 2007|By ASHLEY HARTMAN

QUINCY, Pa. - The 73rd annual Quincy Ox Roast is not just about the 2,500 pounds of beef served - it's also about giving back to the community.

"It started 73 years ago as a means to pay for the streetlights in the village of Quincy," said Larry Forsythe, treasurer of the Quincy Community Ox Roast Association. "It's evolved from that. We now have this land here to maintain and the buildings."

The Ox Roast continues the tradition of paying for the community's streetlight bills, but now also pays for the maintenance of the Quincy Community Center's land, where the event is held. The community center has three softball fields and one football field to maintain, Forsythe said.

"It helps with the support with the streetlights, it helps to get people out," said Ben Thompson, president of the Quincy Community Ox Roast Association. "There are people that come back to the area to do this."

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Many people agree that the food served at the Ox Roast, in particular the roasted, ground, and sliced beef, is a major reason they return each year.

"There's two things," said Gary Jagow of Fairfield, Pa. "On this particular evening, we came for the (car show) and the food."

"The ham and bean soup - it's just the best," he added.

Carol Riffle of Caledonia, Pa., affirmed Jagow's sentiments.

"Every year, we come for the cars - my husband loves the cars - and the food and entertainment," Riffle said. "We like the bean soup."

Riffle plans to come back today for the All Ford Car Show.

Forsythe said about 350 volunteers will serve more than 4,000 people this weekend.

"We owe the success of the Ox Roast to these volunteers," Forsythe said.

The total cost of this year's Ox Roast will be around $40,000, Forsythe said, and he expects proceeds to be between $55,000 and $80,000.

"It's just a good old festival where people come every year," he said.

The Ox Roast offers more than food to the residents and visitors attending the four-day event. Each night features bingo and live music, with car shows Saturday and today, a football game today between the Quincy Panthers and the Waynesboro Stallions and a community yard sale on Monday.

"It's a good relaxing atmosphere, good people and good food," said Tony Hamilton of Rouzerville, Pa.

The event continues through Monday.

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