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Creepy, but can't put it down

Book review: "Sara's Face"

Book review: "Sara's Face"

August 21, 2007|By DYLAN THACKSTON

In a world of peer pressure, hormone-driven teens and harsh rumors, one girl always stood out. In Melvin Burgess's book "Sara's Face," that girl is Sara Carter.

Sara is a girl with a dream, and she will do almost anything to get it. After meeting the monstrously famous Jonathon Heat, notorious for his addiction to plastic surgery, she embarks in an obsessive quest for beauty, love and fame. But along the way, she finds a ghost, hidden secrets in Heat's extravagant mansion and a mysterious door.

Burgess does a wonderful job writing "Sara's Face." One clever aspect of the book is its strange point of view. It's as if the reader were reading an article written about Sara by an investigative journalist. The entire book is written in past tense, but it's an autobiography by this unknown writer, with transcripts of interviews with the characters talking about what happened in the story.

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It's a wonderfully refreshing type of writing to read and keeps you guessing at every turn. From Jonathon Heat's hidden motives to Sara's own mysterious decisions, this book is a roller coaster of love, fame and one's own sanity.

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