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A good ending to a great book series

July 24, 2007|By CHRISTINE BRUGH

Book review

We all know the gist. In J. K. Rowling's popular book series, Harry Potter is a teenage wizard who is the young champion protecting the wizarding world from the expanding power of the dark wizard, Lord Voldemort.

In the previous book, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," Harry was given the task of finding and destroying magical items containing bits of Voldemort's soul; this will make Voldemort mortal. "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," the final book in the series, focuses on this search-and-destroy task, the trials along the way and Harry's final confrontation with Voldemort.

Rowling does an amazing job with concluding the series. Loose ends from previous books are tied up (even if she stretches a bit, as with the case of Percy Weasley), characters develop and respond to the seriousness of the situation in which they find themselves, and Rowling shows how well she can write a mystery novel with numerous unexpected twists and clues.

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Not to say that the book was perfect. Towards the end, Rowling has a lot of explaining to do, and it's not always easy to follow. I found that I had to go back and reread earlier passages to understand exactly what happens. However, this doesn't take away from the overall power of the book. If anything, it makes it better. Once you realize what has transpired, it makes you much more eager to read the next pages.

"Deathly Hallows" is a great book. It's a satisfying end to an amazing series.

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