Advertisement

Men charged with murdering woman they picked up

June 23, 2007|By ANDREW SCHOTZ

MARTINSBURG, W.Va. ? Three days after police found a woman's body in a wooded area, two Berkeley County men have been charged in connection with her death, according to Berkeley County Magistrate Court documents.

Fred Dwayne Douty II, 28, of 1301 Texas St. in Martinsburg, W.Va., and Anthony Charles Juntilla, 37, of 86 Tecumseh Trail in Hedgesville, W.Va., each were arraigned Saturday on one count of first-degree murder, according to charging documents.

They are accused in the documents of killing 41-year-old Tina Marie Starcher of Martinsburg after picking her up and forcing her to have sex with them at Juntilla's home.

On Wednesday, West Virginia State Police found a woman's body between Dam No. 4 Road and Rockymarsh Run, near Scrabble Road, in northeastern Berkeley County. Authorities said Friday that they were treating the case as a homicide.

Advertisement

Juntilla and Douty were arraigned on the murder charges on Saturday and were being held in the Eastern Regional Jail near Martinsburg without bail.

They are facing a possible sentence of life in prison.

They already were in custody Saturday when they were charged under arrest warrants.

Juntilla was arrested Thursday on a charge of retaliating against a public official, and Douty was arrested on Wednesday on a domestic assault charge, according to Mary Angelo, the secretary for Berkeley County Magistrate Jim Humphrey.

According to charging documents, Juntilla was arraigned Thursday on one felony count of threatening to cause injury to a public employee with the intent to retaliate against the individual for performance or nonperformance of an official duty.

According to a complaint filed by Martinsburg Police Department Detective Sgt. G.B. Swartwood, the incident happened May 30 in a Berkeley County Judicial Center meeting room. Juntilla allegedly "loudly" told his attorney that he would like to hit a certain Department of Health and Human Resources child protective services social worker over the head with a chair upon learning the state employee would be appearing at a scheduled court hearing that day.

Juntilla's attorney said in a statement that her client had not made any threats to anyone else involved in the court hearing.

Court records also show that Starcher pleaded guilty to soliciting prostitution in 2004, according to Angelo.

A Herald-Mail account from that time says Starcher allegedly agreed to perform sex acts on a police confidential informant.

Starcher was listed then as living on Centre Street.

Centre Street also is where Douty, who was driving, and Juntilla allegedly picked up Starcher on May 27.

"They asked the female if she wanted to get high," charging documents say, attributing the account to Douty's interview with police after he was arrested on Wednesday.

Starcher got in the back seat of the car and rode with the men to Juntilla's home, but when they got there, she asked if she could go home. Juntilla refused to let her leave until she had sex, according to charging documents.

The men forced Starcher to take off her pants and engage in sex acts with them, according to charging documents.

During the sex acts, Juntilla repeatedly struck Starcher in the face and head with his fist, according to charging documents. Several times, she told him to stop and asked to go home, then she lost consciousness.

Charging documents say the men carried Starcher to an upstairs bathtub, then Juntilla got a knife from the kitchen, slit her throat and poured cleaning liquid in her mouth and on her pelvic area.

The men then placed Starcher's body in a blue container, which they put in the trunk of Juntilla's vehicle, according to charging documents.

With Douty driving, the men took the body to Dam No. 4 Road in Berkeley County, where Juntilla dragged the body into a wooded area, according to charging documents.

Juntilla "kicked the female body until it fell off a rock ledge," the documents say.

In charging documents, West Virginia State Police said they learned of a possible homicide from a man and a woman who called them on June 17.

After finding the body, police sent it to the state medical examiner's office, which figured out her identity on Friday through fingerprints, according to charging documents.

Staff writer Matthew Umstead contributed to this story.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|