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'Body Carnival' exhibit opening

June 04, 2007

Discovery Station at Hagerstown is unveiling a new exhibit called "Body Carnival: The Science and Fun of Being You!" The ribbon cutting will be Tuesday, and the exhibit will be open until September.

"Body Carnival" encompasses 2,000 square feet of space on the first floor of Discovery Station. Eighteen interactive, carnival-themed displays will teach visitors about the human body while investigating force, pressure, light, color and more.

The Tunnel of Blood enables young visitors to crawl through a giant artery to see and hear the effects of plaque buildup on blood flow. A dizzy tunnel tests visitors' balance as they walk through a 10-foot tunnel that simulates a rotating star field. Visitors can put on a pair of vision-distorting goggles and discover how sight affects their ability to walk straight.

Other displays include the House of Color, featuring different sources of light and the chance to "hear" through bones and muscles.

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"Body Carnival" exhibits are accessible to all visitors, including those with low vision. The exhibit includes four audio descriptor units and a charger, which are available from museum desk staff.

The exhibit was developed by the Catawba Science Center in Hickory, N.C., and The Health Adventure in Asheville, N.C., as part of the Traveling Exhibits at Museums of Science (TEAMS) Collaborative, with funding from the National Science Foundation.

Discovery Station is an intergenerational museum of science, technology and history at 101 W. Washington St. in Hagerstown. Discovery Station is also the home of the Hagerstown Aviation Museum, which is included in museum admission.

Discovery Station is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. It is closed on holidays.

Admission prices are $6 for ages 2 to 17; $7 for adults; $5 for seniors (55 and older) and military; $3 for students; free for teachers. Group rates are available.

For more information, go to www.discoverystation.org.

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