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Juvenile court briefs

April 26, 2007|By ERIN JULIUS

Three boys admit to destroying mailbox



Three boys admitted Wednesday in juvenile court to destroying someone's mailbox with a soda bottle bomb.

The boys, two 17-year-olds and an 18-year-old, admitted to police that they made the soda bottle bomb. They wrote letters of apology to the owner of the mailbox, police and the fire marshal, who responded to the explosion, lawyers for the defense said. The boys said they also repaired the mailbox.

Two of the boys, who are graduating from high school this year, plan to join the U.S. Marine Corps. The third boy is on track to graduate next year, a school official said.

The boys found the idea for the soda bottle bomb on the Internet, one of the defense attorneys said.

"Let's start acting like adults, like Marines," said Washington County Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley, who was sitting in juvenile court.

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Teen gets probation in police chase case



A 17-year-old boy admitted Wednesday in juvenile court to fleeing and eluding police.

The boy was traveling at 99 mph when he accelerated after police tried to make a traffic stop, Assistant State's Attorney Michelle Flores said. The police officer reached speeds of 110 mph during the ensuing chase, so the boy was traveling at least that fast, she said.

The boy said he tried to get away from the police because he was scared.

Washington County Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley, sitting in juvenile court, called the offense "very serious," and said the boy could have killed himself or someone else.

The boy's mother said she took away his car and license for a while after the incident.

Beachley placed the boy on indefinite supervised probation and ordered him to complete 40 hours of community service.




Boy admits to driving without a license



A 16-year-old boy admitted Wednesday in juvenile court to driving without a license.

The boy was 15 when he took his brother's car for a joy ride, Assistant State's Attorney Michelle Flores said.

The boy violated his probation for a previous offense by admitting to the driving offense.

Disposition, the juvenile equivalent of a sentencing, was delayed.

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