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Blast from the past

January 31, 2007

Week of Jan. 28, 1957

Among the people made happiest by the big birth rate being experienced in Washington County are local merchants. Each new arrival represents a new consumer with a loud demand for his or her own food, housing and merchandise. The latest figures released by the National Office of Vital Statistics show that the birth rate based on local residence is up to 21.6 per 1,000 people. The baby boom is attributable largely to economic well-being. Young people are getting married earlier in life and are having children sooner and in greater numbers than their parents did. What we are experiencing now, say the economists, is nothing compared to what we might expect in the 1960s, when the huge crop of babies born in the last 10 years begins to reach marriageable age.




The Board of County Commissioners was advised by the chairman of the State Roads Commission that it would not be practical at this time to construct a second lane of U.S. Rt. 40 a distance of six miles east of Hagerstown. The chairman said that it is scheduled for 1958-61. The County Board had asked the State Roads Commission to construct a second lane east of the city because of the large volume of traffic.

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A Dutch family arrived safely in Harpers Ferry last evening after a trip from the Hague, Netherlands. The Rev. Newton Poling, pastor of the Brownsville Church of the Brethren, along with some of his parishioners, met the family when they got off the train in New York. The family was put up in the newly remodeled house on the church farm.




Week of Jan. 28, 1982



Local officials gave away about 500 five-pound blocks of cheese on the last scheduled day of the government distribution program, but still have about 1,200 packages remaining. The Reagan administration decided recently to give 30 million pounds to needy families. "The idea of getting something free from the government is really very exciting for these people," said the Community Action Council's Judy Chambers. CAC is considering three plans to parcel out the remaining cheese: Giving the cheese to six food banks; distributing it through the Commission on Aging and the Department of Social Services; and storing some at the CAC office.




Word processing is being taught to keep up with technology. "Shorthand is pass," says J. Michael Nye of Marketing Consultants International. His wife, Linda Nye, said "The want ads for word processing operators alone who have been trained is great. And look at how much they offer per hour for beginners: $9, $10 and $12. This really is the future."

- Compiled by Kelly Moreno

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