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Book brings slave history to vivid life

January 30, 2007|by DARCY SHULL

Review

Picture this: You are a 15-year-old girl in Africa. You and your tribe work hard in the heat all day, but you enjoy the sound of tribal drums, singing and dancing around a fire at night. Soon, you will be married, and you anxiously but happily await the wonderful new life you will have with Besa, your husband.

Welcome to the life of Amari, a young African woman living in South Africa during the time when slavery was practiced. She loves her life, playing with her little brother, listening to her father's stories and helping her mother and the other young women of the village with chores.

One day, however, pale-skinned visitors destroy Amari's town and capture or kill the villagers. In the American colonies, Amari is sold as a slave but meets new friends - an indentured girl, a black cook and the cook's son.

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While reading this novel, I could feel the sorrows the characters had to endure. I could feel fear the dangers they encountered.

After reading "Copper Sun," I appreciate that no one I know had to endure these horrifying events.

The author uses enough description in her book that you can almost feel the heat in the jungles or the sting from the whip.

I recommend this book to teenagers who, like me, like historical fiction.

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