Advertisement

High time for cranberries

December 19, 2006|by ALEXANDRA CANTONE

SOUTH CARVER, Mass. - Cranberries are one of the few fruits native to North America. One of the best growing locations is southeast Massachusetts, the home of Ocean Spray, a co-op for cranberry growers.

Edaville USA in South Carver, Mass., is home to approximately 14,000 acres of cranberries. Every year, at harvest time, Edaville hosts a cranberry festival with lots of cranberries and a lot of fun activities for children.

Cranberries grow on bushes that like wet soil. The cranberry plants are planted in low land and then flooded, which makes a bog. After the cranberries are fully matured, a big machine is used to agitate the flooded areas, loosening up the cranberries. This makes the cranberries float to the top so they can be seen.

When the berries float, they look like a big red blur on the bog. The cranberries are rounded up and collected to be sent off to Ocean Spray.

Advertisement

During Edaville's festival in October, people are allowed to take some of these cranberries. My family visited during the festival, and we got some cranberries.

There was so much to do at the festival - listen to a band, check out a display of dollhouses and see all the cranberry-based foods people were selling, such as jams, sauces and cranberry-chocolate bars.

There are so many things that you can make with tart and tangy cranberries.

At Edaville's festival, there are amusement rides. One of the main tourist attractions is the train. This train takes you all around the farm and takes you past all the cranberry bogs. There are so many cranberries.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|