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Juvenile court briefs

October 26, 2006|by PEPPER BALLARD

Boy accused of threat awaiting placement



A 16-year-old boy who allegedly called in a bomb threat to South Hagerstown High School in September was ordered detained pending placement in a Department of Juvenile Services special program.

Washington County Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley, sitting in juvenile court, asked the youth if the nearly three months he has spent detained because of the threat was worth calling it in. The boy, who entered an Alford plea to disturbing the orderly conduct of school, said "No, sir."

Under an Alford plea, a respondent does not admit guilt, but admits that the state has sufficient evidence to gain a finding of delinquency.

At about 8 a.m. Sept. 7, the school's secretary answered a call from a person who said, "I'm calling in a bomb threat for 9 a.m." and then hung up, Washington County Assistant State's Attorney Michelle Flores said.

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A caller who dialed 911 shortly afterward told a dispatcher, "South will blow," she said.

Flores said that that call was traced to the boy, who told police he accidentally dropped his cell phone on the school bus and might have been talking about the bomb threat.

The boy's attorney, Assistant Public Defender Stephen Bergman, said the boy did not make that statement.

Beachley ordered the youth placed in the Department of Juvenile Services "Redirect" program, an impact program in Western Maryland for those with minimal offenses. He ordered the youth remain at the Western Maryland Children's Center pending placement in the program.




Teen admits to resisting police arrest



A 17-year-old boy admitted in Washington County juvenile court Wednesday to resisting arrest in connection with a July 15 domestic violence call to his Hagerstown home.

On July 15 at about 7:30 a.m., the boy and his brother were found by police in a fight, allegedly instigated by their mother, Washington County Assistant State's Attorney Michelle Flores said.

The boy got upset when police tried to get past his mother to arrest his brother, and then resisted his own arrest, she said.

Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley, sitting in juvenile court, delayed disposition for the youth, who was ordered to take prescribed medication pending his November hearing.




Boy pleads with judge for another chance



A 16-year-old boy cried Wednesday throughout a Washington County juvenile court hearing and pleaded with the judge to give him a chance to stay with his sick mother and improve his behavior.

The Department of Juvenile Services recommended that the boy, who admitted to felony theft, be placed outside his home at a youth center. A department representative said the boy has a record of thefts and drug use.

Through tears, the boy told Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley, sitting in juvenile court: "I'd just like to have the chance to turn my life around ... No one in my family graduated from high school ... I want to show my mom before she goes that I can graduate from high school."

The boy admitted to stealing a motor scooter from a garage on East Franklin Street on Aug. 29 at 9:15 p.m.

Washington County Assistant State's Attorney Michelle Flores said, "He saw the scooter in the garage so he took it. He needed a ride to his drug and alcohol classes."

The boy's mother told Beachley through tears that cancer she had removed last year has come back. She said she was hoping her son wouldn't find out while he was detained because she didn't want to upset him.

After a bench conference with attorneys, Beachley told the boy, "I'm gonna give you a chance, but if you blow it, you only have yourself to blame."

Beachley placed the boy on a suspended youth center program placement and ordered the youth to serve house arrest through Dec. 31.




Boy admits he tied, bound little brother



A 16-year-old boy admitted in Washington County juvenile court Wednesday that he tied and bound his little brother with video game cords after the little brother fiddled with his game controller.

The 16-year-old, who admitted to second-degree assault, was playing video games with his 14-year-old brother April 2 and became agitated when the younger brother teased him by messing with his hands and controller, Washington County Assistant State's Attorney Michelle Flores said.

"He tied (little brother) up with game cords and wrapped them around his wrists and ankles tight enough that (little brother) was bruised," she said.

The boy's attorney, Assistant Public Defender Stephen Bergman, said, "It initially started out as horseplay and then escalated."

Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley, sitting in juvenile court, delayed disposition so a predisposition investigation could be completed.




Girl admits she stole classmate's iPod



A 15-year-old girl admitted in Washington County juvenile court Wednesday to stealing a classmate's iPod at Williamsport High School in March.

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