Advertisement

Classic themes, different views in riveting book

June 27, 2006|by FEDORA COPLEY

From the time I started reading "The Tenth Circle" by Jodi Picoult, I was enthralled. This wasn't necessarily a good thing, as it meant I had trouble doing chores, eating meals with my family, and staying on purpose. But the book was amazing; what can I say?

Picoult keeps the reader on the alert - there are a lot of plot twists, some explained just enough to make you have to piece the particles together.

The book explores Trixie Stone's life. Trixie is 14, and experimenting with boundaries, love and life. Early in the book a life-changing event takes place, one that Trixie will deal with for the rest of the book.

Strangely, we're unclear exactly what happened, and to give another spin, we see the same event from different characters' different points of view. This is one of the aspects I really liked. The reader gets to hear the thoughts of several different characters, giving the book depth.

Advertisement

The themes are classic - girl dealing with adolescence; mom dealing with unexciting marriage and trials with daughter; dad dealing with mid-life, his past, his daughter. But something about the perspective makes it new.

The interwoven twists and character development are believable. There isn't the contrived feeling often found in books. "The Tenth Circle" is seamless.

Making the book more interesting is an interspersed graphic novel. The mini story parallels the main one, and comes from the point of view of Trixie's dad. He is a graphic artist, so it's like we see the artwork he creates. Like a little summary of an already fun book, the art takes hold of the story (and the reader) and brings it alive with detail and characters.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|