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Arc selling campground

June 20, 2006|by ERIN CUNNINGHAM

HAGERSTOWN

The Indian Springs Campground in Big Pool was put on the market Monday by Arc of Washington County for an asking price of $650,000.

Phyllis Landry, Arc's executive director, said the nonprofit has owned the campground for eight or nine years. She said it costs more to operate the campground than the organization makes from it, which led to the decision to sell.

"It became more expensive than what we could continue," she said.

The money from the sale would go to Arc's programming, which recently expanded in several areas, Landry said. She said the association is not having financial trouble.

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"This was very proactive," Landry said.

The campground sits on 39 acres and includes 40 campsites, a building, a large pavilion and a pond, according to Roger Fairbourn Realty, which is handling the property.

Arc, which serves about 1,200 clients with developmental disabilities, used the site for magic shows, dances, sleepovers and other activities. Landry said Arc intends to continue to offer those activities for its clients, but at other places in Washington County, like City Park.

Landry said Arc also will be increasing its fundraising efforts as it expands programming and services related to its elderly clientele and those with autism.

"The money will go into programs to improve what we have here," she said.

Arc also owns and maintains about 50 homes for its clients.

"These need to be handicapped-accessible," she said. "And we need to spend money to do it."

Programming has expanded to include an improved senior program and a recently initiated autism program. Arc's small-business opportunities for clients also have expanded.

"More folks are showing an interest in that," Landry said.

Clients who show an interest in working choose from a variety of businesses, including paper shredding, lawn care, vending and car washing. The clients then operate the businesses with the help of Arc staff. The clients keep 100 percent of the profits.

"We see (the changes) as taking what we already did really well and making it even better," she said.

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