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Letters to the editor

June 09, 2006

Bandwagon fans cheapen the sport



To the editor:

Why must true sports fans be continually pestered by the so-called "bandwagon fans" every season? These people have no particular liking for any team; however, they are a continual nuisance to those of us who truly follow sports. We are fans of the same team every year and never switch allegiance, even when our team is doing badly.

The bandwagon fans will talk about the team as if they have studied it their entire lives. In most cases, these people are wrong about everything and, when we attempt to point this out, the "emerging fans" will insist that we are wrong.

The typical bandwagon fans, or "emerging fans," watch the standings and odds for all teams for about half the season.

They then flock en masse to the team which seems to be having the best season. If a different team than the one they first chose seems to be having a better season, the bandwagoners then change allegiances. This practice is common not only in team sports, but also in individual events. Nobody will admit to being a bandwagon fan, although a large number of "sports fans" fall into that category.

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The worst part of the bandwagoners' practice is that it has given true fans a bad reputation and destroys our credibility. If our favorite team is in the Super Bowl, or the World Series or the Stanley Cup finals, then we are automatically accused of being a bandwagoner, even if we have liked that team all of our lives. If we point out to someone that they were a fan of a different team one week ago, we are accused of being sore winners. The only safe bet is to be a bandwagoner for the worst team!

I have no problem with new fans. I love to see more people rooting for my team. My message to the bandwagon fans is this: Choose a team that you like, learn about them, root for them, and stick with them no matter what. That is what being a true sports fan is all about. A diehard philosophy? Maybe. But when your team is finally the best, after hardships and losses, it's all worthwhile.

Jason A. Camarano

Williamsport




Everyone has the right to speak



To the editor:

For nearly 90 years, it has been the mission of the National Park Service to not only preserve and protect our nation's natural and historic resources, but also to make those areas available for use by all Americans. On occasion, that use transcends mere education or recreation, as evidenced by the scheduled June 10 rally of the World Knights of the Ku Klux Klan at Antietam National Battlefield.

National Park areas provide a forum in which citizens can exercise their constitutional rights, including the freedom of speech and assembly. The United States Constitution guarantees everyone the right to speak freely and to assemble peaceably, regardless of the content of their message.

In approving the request of the Ku Klux Klan to demonstrate on Antietam Battlefield, the National Park Service is not condoning the message being delivered by their members. Rather, we are providing an arena in which they can deliver their message, the validity of which will ultimately be decided by those who hear it.

And of course we are providing the opportunity for those with a dissenting point of view to make their beliefs known as well.

The National Park Service hosts hundreds of First Amendment activities each year at its more than 350 sites across the country. Though the messages delivered are as diverse as the parks that host them, the one constant is that each of those assemblies is a living, breathing example of our nation's democratic ideals and freedoms.

The management of Antietam National Battlefield has worked diligently in planning for these First Amendment activities to ensure that everyone, visitors and demonstrators alike, will find a safe atmosphere in which to visit.

J.W. Howard

Superintendent

Antietam National Battlefield




To lighten the load ..



To the editor:

"Laughter lightens the load," and love, prayer, and Scripture study strengthens us to lift it from our shoulders.

Larry D. Kump

Falling Waters, W.Va.

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