Advertisement

An old sound from a rock legend

May 09, 2006|by KYLE LEFLER

The Boss is back, but he's not playing what you might expect.

Bruce Springsteen's latest release, "We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions," is a tribute to Pete Seeger's protest music of the 1950s and '60s.

Seeger became famous by writing songs such as "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "Turn, Turn, Turn." Springsteen was asked to do a cover of "We Shall Overcome" in 1997 and became increasingly interested in Seeger's music as a result. In turn, he decided to record an album of Seeger classics.

Springsteen and his folk band of talented musicians recorded the album in three one-day sessions, with no studio dubs or retakes. The album includes old folk classics like "Erie Canal" and "Jacob's Ladder," as well as some lesser knowns.

Advertisement

Listening takes you back in time to the days when music was played on front porch steps, not in huge concert arenas. The powerful vocals of Springsteen and his wife, Patti Scialfa, blend naturally, creating a rich, real folk sound.

Anyone, not just hippie liberal types, can identify with these songs that cry for peace and unity. Springsteen hits the mark on this unique, folk album, which is, as he says on the album notes, "Music being made, not played."

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|