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Roll call

May 07, 2006|By Thomas Voting Reports

HOUSE



Ethics, lobbyist rules

Voting 217 for and 213 against, the House on May 3 passed a Republican bill (HR 4975) in response to ethics and lobbying scandals on Capitol Hill. The bill requires members to get pre-approval from the House Ethics Committee for privately financed travel, subjects the secretive appropriations known as earmarks to public disclosure, and requires lobbyists to post quarterly Internet reports on their campaign contributions and gifts to lawmakers and staff. The bill, which also limits individual contributions to "Section 527" non-profit advocacy groups, now must be combined with a tougher Senate measure.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Roscoe Bartlett, R-6, yes

Pennsylvania

Bill Shuster, R-9, yes

West Virginia

Shelley Moore Capito, R-2, yes

Democrat's ethics bill

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Voting 213 for and 216 against, the House on May 3 defeated a Democratic bid for stricter ethics and lobbying rules than those offered by Republicans in HR 4975. The substitute sought to make it a felony for lawmakers to influence hiring decisions within lobbyist firms, and to require House-Senate conference committees to vote openly on secretly added changes to bills. Additionally, Democrats sought to bar members and staff from accepting travel on corporate aircraft as well as gifts and meals from lobbyists, among other provisions.

A yes vote backed the Democrats' measure.

Maryland

Bartlett, no

Pennsylvania

Shuster, no

West Virginia

Capito, no

Gasoline price gouging

Voting 389 for and 34 against, the House on May 3 sent the Senate a bill (HR 5253) directing the Federal Trade Commission to investigate and prosecute price gouging by sellers of gasoline, home-heating oil, diesel fuel and crude oil. The bill imposes civil and criminal penalties, but leaves it up to the FTC to define price gouging.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, yes

Oil refinery construction

Voting 237 for and 188 against, members on May 3 failed to reach a two-thirds majority needed to pass a bill (HR 5254) expanding the government's power to coordinate the approval of federal and non-federal permits for new oil refineries and pipelines. The bill, which addressed a 30-year hiatus in U.S. refinery construction, was opposed mainly on environmental grounds and because it was rushed to the floor under rules that barred amendments. The bill directed the president to identify at least three abandoned military bases as possible refinery sites.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, yes

U.S. port security

Voting 421 for and two against, the House on May 4 passed a bill (HR 4954) to deter terrorists' cargo, such as nuclear devices, from entering U.S. ports. The bill authorizes $7.4 billion over five years, although actual spending will depend on later budget choices.

The bill requires all U.S. ports to employ radiation-detection gear by September 2007; authorizes grants to U.S. ports based on risk rather then politics; requires better screening overseas of high-risk containers bound for America, and directs states to provide Washington with data on port employees in sensitive positions for checking against terrorist watch lists. No funds in the bill can be used to establish permanent U.S. military bases in Iraq or exercise U.S. control over Iraqi oil. The bill awaits Senate action.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, yes

100% overseas screening

Voting 202 for and 222 against, the House on May 4 defeated a Democratic bid to require electronic screening of all U.S.-bound containers at foreign ports. The underlying bill (HR 4954, above) requires electronic screening only of containers thought to pose risk. Amendment backers said 100 percent screening is essential to U.S. security, while opponents called it unworkable and said it would cripple international trade.

A yes vote backed 100 percent overseas screening.

Maryland

Bartlett, no

Pennsylvania

Shuster, no

West Virginia

Capito, no

SENATE



Northrop Grumman earmark

Voting 48 for and 51 against, senators on May 2 rejected an amendment to remove $200 million earmarked for Northrop Grumman Corp. from a $108 billion appropriations bill (HR 4939) to pay for war, hurricane recovery and other purposes. The earmark would cover uninsured losses from Hurricane Katrina at the company's Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Miss.

A yes vote opposed the earmark.

Maryland

Paul Sarbanes, D, no

Barbara Mikulski, D, no

Pennsylvania

Rick Santorum, R, yes

Arlen Specter, R, no

West Virginia

Robert Byrd, D, yes

John Rockefeller, D, not voting

War, Katrina spending

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