Advertisement

To meet, or not to meet ...

March 26, 2006

Fewer aspects of working life merit as much derision as the office meeting. The natural lair of bloviation specialists the world over, meetings have attained a timeless place in the annals of workplace ridicule. Or have they?

One reason there are so many meetings in the American workplace is that many people covertly view them as a positive part of the job, according to a team of researchers who studied the effects of meeting time on employee well-being.

"When speaking publicly, people generally claim that they hate meetings," said Steven G. Rogelberg, an industrial and organizational psychologist at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. "But in the surveys you see a different story - some people's private sentiments are much more positive."

The study found that workers are affected differently by meetings based on whether they are considered high or low in "accomplishment striving" rankings. High rankings are those who are very goal- and task-oriented and see meetings as an obstruction to productivity. Low accomplishment striving folks viewed meetings as a welcome means to structure their day.

Advertisement

The data are from surveys with 980 employees. The study is in the March issue of the Journal of Applied Psychology.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|