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Cooking for kids' sake

Franklin County Prison employees sold food Friday to raise money for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Franklin County Prison employees sold food Friday to raise money for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

March 25, 2006|By DON AINES

Correctional officers and staff at Franklin County Prison were cooking for kids' sake Friday in advance of today's Bowl for Kids' Sake benefiting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Franklin County.

"Breakfast of champions," one officer said as another bit into a hamburger about 10:15 a.m. Correctional Officer Bob Fink was working at the gas grill outside while other staff members were setting out the condiments, chips, salads and desserts, or enjoying an early lunch.

"We had a lot of people really chip in and help this year," said records specialist Michelle Davis, noting financial contributions from probation officers, judges and other county employees, along with the homemade pies and cakes.

Fink said the hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, sodas and buns all were donated by companies that supply the prison. Fink said the prison staff wanted to add several hundred dollars to the $1,500 already raised in advance of the ninth annual Bowl for Kids' Sake at Nellie Fox Bowl at 3587 Molly Pitcher Highway.

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Today at 10 a.m., the first group of 51 five-member teams from various companies and organizations will begin knocking down pins at Nellie Fox. This is Big Brothers Big Sisters' biggest fundraiser of the year, Special Events Coordinator Michele Gavazzi said.

Last year, the teams and sponsors raised $39,472 for Big Brothers Big Sisters, Gavazzi said. The money supports programs benefiting 175 children in the county, she said.

Along with its core program of matching volunteers to boys and girls in need of adult guidance, friendship and mentoring, Gavazzi said Big Brothers Big Sisters also has mentoring programs in which high school and college students mentor children. Those programs are at Waynesboro, Chambersburg, Greencastle-Antrim and James Buchanan high schools and Shippensburg University, she said.

While money is important to the programs, Gavazzi said volunteers are crucial. There are 38 children on the waiting list in the county and "we're in desperate need of male volunteers."

Fink said the prison has had a bowling team at today's event for six years, while the barbecue is in its second year.

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