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Future growth won't be confined to Inwood area

February 13, 2006|by ROBERT SNYDER

INWOOD,W.Va. - Much of the Mill Creek area's growth can be attributed to the availability of land and the existence of infrastructure, said Eastern Panhandle Homebuilders Association President Dwayne Wean.

"Anywhere in Berkeley County right now, as long as you have the key elements - water, sewer and good roads - it makes (land) a valuable commodity right now," Wean said.

That means future growth won't be confined to the Inwood area, Wean said.

The sewer district's planned expansion in the northern part of the county promises to add 30 miles of collection lines and a treatment plant that will be capable of processing 1 million gallons of wastewater daily.

"You'll see it explode just like the south end," Collins said.

That project's first phase, which will cover the high-density Interstate 81 and U.S. 11 corridors in the Bedington and Spring Mills areas, will add more than 2,500 customers once construction is complete in 2007.

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The Falling Waters tax district received the second highest number of plat approvals last year, for 903 lots on more than 116 acres.

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