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Steelers seal deal

Local fans savor Pittsburgh victory

Local fans savor Pittsburgh victory

February 06, 2006|by ERIN CUNNINGHAM

HAGERSTOWN

erinc@herald-mail.com

Ken Schroer saw the Pittsburgh Steelers win their third world championship in 1979. He was cheering just as loudly for their fourth title in 1980.

On Sunday, he was at Colonial Restaurant and Lounge in Hagerstown cheering his team to its fifth Super Bowl win since 1975.

"They were due, and they deserve it," said Theresa Doherty of Hagerstown, who watched the game at The Corner Pub. "It worked this year, and it wasn't just one person making it happen."

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Eric Mentzer of Hagerstown said the Steelers and the Seattle Seahawks were both nervous at the start of the game. It wasn't until close to halftime when the Steelers looked like the team that beat the Cincinnati Bengals, Indianapolis Colts and Denver Broncos.

A final touchdown in the fourth quarter that put the Steelers up 21-10, sealed it.

Tim Glunt of Hagerstown also watched the game at The Corner Pub.

"I'm excited," he said. "They've won all their road games. Nobody else has done that. We beat the first, second and third seeds just to get to the Super Bowl."

The Steelers were the sixth seed in the playoffs and are the first team to win the Super Bowl from that spot, he said.

"It's a big game," Mentzer said. "I think everyone is nervous for the Super Bowl."

While the players worked to overcome their jitters, many fans at Colonial Restaurant and Lounge weren't nervous at all.

"We're going to win," said Jason Jones of Greencastle, Pa., shortly into the first quarter, when the Seahawks were leading by three points.

Suzy Abeles of Hagerstown said the Seahawks hadn't gotten off to the strong start they had against other teams in the playoffs early in the game Sunday.

"It'll get better," she said. "They just need to move the ball."

While watching the Steelers score their second touchdown of the game, Don Houghton of Johnstown, Pa., said he wished he were seeing the game live.

"There is nothing like a Steelers game," he said.

Houghton said he thought Pittsburgh's defense would wear down the Seahawks, who were the first to score.

"They got it," he said, of the Steelers. "They're going to win. I told everyone that after I saw them win over Indianapolis. They were the better team then, and they're still the best team."

Glunt and Doherty said the Steelers were playing for their running back, Jerome Bettis, who likely will retire at the end of the season. The Super Bowl was in Detroit - Bettis' hometown.

"They're playing for him," Glunt said. "They wanted to win it for him."

Karin Lytle of Hagerstown said she had faith the Steelers would win all season.

She and about 100 people went to Tri-State Fellowship in Hagerstown for a Super Bowl party. Lytle was among about 20 people who watched the game upstairs in the "serious watchers" area.

Richard Hay of Greencastle, Pa., said he was surprised the Steelers made it to the Super Bowl.

"I really didn't think they could beat Denver," he said. "But they did."

Hay's children, Lauren and Connor, and his wife, Kim, were at Tri-State Fellowship, but not in the upstairs room with Hay.

Doherty was among just a few Steelers fans at The Corner Pub. The Seahawks fans, she said, were upstairs.

"That's why it's so quiet up there," she said after the win. "They just had it in their heart. It's having the passion. They had it in their eyes."

Chris Frank of Fairfield, Pa., said the Steelers were a better team, and he believed they should have had a larger lead throughout the game.

"They were trying to go big every play," he said in the second quarter. "It's not working."

It was the lack of playoff experience on both sides that led to a slow start, said Darrin Sabol of Hagerstown. But he never believed the Steelers had a big advantage, despite football forecasters predicting a Steelers win.

In the first half, the game was close, and Ken Bowman said the Steelers weren't playing an aggressive game.

"They better start playing their game," he said. "They're still going to win, though."

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