Advertisement

Roll call

February 05, 2006|By Thomas Voting Reports

HOUSE



Deficit reduction



Voting 216 for and 214 against, the House on Feb. 1 sent President Bush the conference report on a Republican bill (S 1932) to slow spending growth by $39.4 billion over the next five years. The bill achieves its savings mainly by curbing entitlement spending for social programs and through revenue increases. About $6.4 billion of the entitlement cuts would come from Medicare, $4.8 billion from Medicaid, $3 billion from child-support collection and $2.7 billion from farm programs. Cuts and increases in student loan programs would yield net savings of $11.9 billion.

The bill would raise $7.4 billion by auctioning off spectrum freed up by the emergence of digital television, and $3.6 billion-plus by raising company premiums for federal pension insurance, among other revenue measures.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Roscoe Bartlett, R-6, yes

Pennsylvania

Bill Shuster, R-9, yes

West Virginia

Shelley Moore Capito, R-2, yes

Advertisement

Ex-members who lobby



The House on Feb. 1 voted, 379 for and 50 against, to deny access to the House floor and gymnasium by ex-members who have become registered lobbyists, as well as by lobbyist-spouses of current members. The ban (H Res 648) was added to House rules.

Republican leaders called this the first of several steps to limit members' ties to lobbyists, while Democrats termed it "a Band-Aid" on much larger ethical problems.

A yes vote backed the rules change.

Maryland

Bartlett, no

Pennsylvania

Shuster, no

West Virginia

Capito, yes

SENATE



Justice Samuel Alito



Voting 58 for and 42 against, the Senate on Jan. 31 confirmed Samuel A. Alito Jr., 55, a federal appeals judge, as the 110th justice of the Supreme Court.

All Republican senators except Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island voted to confirm Alito. The lone independent, James Jeffords of Vermont, and all Democrats except Robert Byrd of West Virginia, Kent Conrad of North Dakota, Tim Johnson of South Dakota and Ben Nelson of Nebraska voted against the nominee.

A yes vote was to confirm Alito.

Maryland

Paul Sarbanes, D, no

Barbara Mikulski, D, no

Pennsylvania

Arlen Specter, R, yes

Rick Santorum, R, yes

West Virginia

Robert Byrd, D, yes

John Rockefeller, D, no




$70 billion tax cuts



Senators on Feb. 2 passed, 66 for and 31 against, a bill (HR 4297) to cut personal and business taxes by $70 billion over the next five years, more than offsetting five-year spending curbs now moving through Congress on a parallel track. The bill's largest provision temporarily would protect 14 million middle-income taxpayers against the Alternative Minimum Tax. The AMT originally was designed to keep wealthy filers from using loopholes to avoid taxation, but now is ensnaring the middle class because it lacks indexing against inflation.

A yes vote was to send the bill to House-Senate conference.

Maryland

Sarbanes, no

Mikulski, no

Pennsylvania

Specter, yes

Santorum, yes

West Virginia

Rockefeller, yes

Byrd, no




Veterans vs. tax cuts



Voting 44 for and 53 against, senators on Feb. 2 defeated a Democratic amendment to scale back capital gains and dividends tax relief by $18 billion and allocate the savings to medical care for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. The amendment was offered to HR 4297.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Maryland

Sarbanes, yes

Mikulski, yes

Pennsylvania

Specter, no

Santorum, no

West Virginia

Byrd, yes

Rockefeller, yes




Katrina Commission



Voting 44 for and 53 against, senators on Feb. 2 rejected a Democratic amendment to HR 4297 to establish an independent, bipartisan commission, modeled after the 9/11 Commission, to probe federal, state and local preparation for and responses to Hurricane Katrina.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Maryland

Sarbanes, yes

Mikulski, yes

Pennsylvania

Specter, no

Santorum, no

West Virginia

Byrd, yes

Rockefeller, yes




Key votes ahead



In the week of Feb. 6, the Senate will take up a bill concerning lawsuits based on asbestos exposure. The House's legislative schedule was to be announced early in the week.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|