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A different sort of 'Harry'

July 19, 2005|by FEDORA COPLEY

All I wanted to do Saturday morning at 12:01 a.m. was get my hands on "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," the sixth book in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling, and some 100-yard line wasn't going to stop me.

This book continued from Book 5 - "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" - seamlessly, although the intro is quite different than the past books. It seemed to wrap up some old mysteries rather well, like why Voldemort, Harry's nemesis, wasn't killed when his curse backfired upon himself. Harry seems more mature and lets his temper get the better of him less.

The dialogue is brilliant as always, and J.K. Rowling chose the right girl for him definitely, I think. Lots more about love lives than any other book in the series, but I'm not complaining. Rowling can write about love and romance with equal intensity as the very climax of the book.

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The first half of the book is slower than previous books, with small subplots, of course, but we really aren't sure where the book is taking us, so when we reach the climax it is intense and wonderful, because everything seems to happen in a blur of wands and death eaters. It is a well-written book, although I found some worn-out phrases in the narrative. Quiddich is still just as good, and Rowling continues to come up with interesting scenarios and action.

I felt that the book was poorly titled, because the half-blood prince didn't have anything to do with the plot - it was a subplot and seemed rushed in its development. Not as long nor as exciting as the fifth book, it was refreshing to see a plot not centered around Harry. It partly had to do with Harry, but also it didn't seem like everything revolved around him.

It is not so exhilarating as the last books, and left me feeling a bit empty, but as I am mulling things over, a sense of completion comes over me. It is a book that makes the reader think and look back, and so feels more significant. No complaints, it was definitely a sequel worth reading.

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