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Cupid questions?

Experts offer Valentine's Day advice for teens

Experts offer Valentine's Day advice for teens

February 08, 2005|by ANDREA ROWLAND
(Page 2 of 2)

Even the best valentines can't read minds. While you might be planning a day of romance, your boyfriend or girlfriend might view Feb. 14 as the same as any other day. A bit of preparation can help you avoid disappointment, Weston said.

"This all has to be handled with care. If you think there's a pretty good chance that he's clueless about the 14th, drop him a hint," she said. "Tell him you're planning a surprise for him. Some wonderful boyfriends are not great romantics. Don't confuse his Valentine's gift (or lack thereof) for his feelings."

In addition to being less romantic, in general, than teenage girls, Carle said, teen guys might not have any idea how to approach Valentine's Day. It's OK to gently express disappointment if you feel let down, but try to understand where your guy's coming from.

"While the girl gets all mushy, the boy doesn't know what to do," Carle said. "Don't be surprised if the boy stays away on Valentine's Day because he doesn't know how to handle it."

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Party planner


Thinking about a party for Valentine's Day? Here are a few party game ideas for the younger teen set from www.parentingteens.about.com:

· Get the conversation started with a game of Broken Hearts. Cut large hearts out of red construction paper. Cut hearts in half, using a zig-zag or other shapes, making each one unique. You should have enough half hearts so that each person at the party gets one. As your guests arrive, hand them one of the half hearts and tell them to find their match by finding the other half.

· Here's another icebreaker: Write names of famous couples on mailing labels. Place one label on the back of each arriving guest. The goal is for guests to guess who the famous couple is by asking yes or no questions to other people at the party. They may not ask the same person more than one question.

· Give your guests a sweet tooth with a game of Candy Heart Jar. Fill a decorative jar with candy hearts, and have guests guess how many hearts are in the jar. The person who comes close without going over takes home the jar of candy.

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