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Skip the hangover

Companies tout ways to prevent effects of overindulgence

Companies tout ways to prevent effects of overindulgence

December 27, 2004|by RYAN C. TUCK

Whether before, after or while ringing in the new year with a few drinks, there are remedies available to make the next day a little more bearable.

A new "little purple pill," a type of relief that has existed since the 1800s, and a patented pill all are available to heavy and light drinkers alike during a holiday season known for giving people reasons to drink, and reasons to regret it the next day.

Patrick Cochrane, CEO of Dynamarketing Group Inc., the California company that has created the Rebound Hangover Formula, said he has received requests from international models and movie stars for the new "little purple pill."

Working on the belief that hangovers result from the way the body metabolizes alcohol and not the alcohol itself, the formula helps the liver handle byproducts of the metabolizing process before they are released into the bloodstream, and eventually cause hangovers.

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"You don't have to be a big drinker or a party animal to get a hangover," Cochrane said, citing studies that suggest that as few as three drinks could lead to a hangover. "Why should you have to deal with nausea and headaches when (so little can cause hangovers)?"

Dynamarketing released the formula, which works by taking two pills with every two drinks, in August, and will next month release a liquid version.

The formula now is sold online at www.reboundhangover.com and will be sold in retail locations nationwide starting in January.

Cochrane said the plan eventually is to sell the pills in bars and clubs.

"People don't want to be reminded that they might overindulge by having to buy the pills at the Web site, but if they're right in front of you, people are more likely to use (them)," he said.

While the "little purple pill" has only recently been available to drinkers, nux vomica and homeopathy have been curing the effects of overindulgence since the 19th century.

Working through homeopathy - a system that stimulates the body's natural means of recovery - Nux vom, from Nelson Bach USA Ltd., is a natural way for the body to handle the effects of hangovers.

Denise Eaton, retail-training coordinator for Nelson Bach, said Nux vom is the most natural and comprehensive way to curb the effects of the "holiday hangover" because it stimulates the body's natural system of recovery from the effects of overindulgence.

"This is a natural way for the body to heal on its own," Eaton said.

Sold in natural health food stores and online at www.nelsonbach.com, Nux vom comes in a pill form and can be ingested after a night of drinking.

Because of the easy and natural solution that Nux vom provides, it is a popular choice for drinkers on holidays, Eaton said.

"For any problem, make sure you have your Nux vom," Eaton said.

And while both Nux vom and the rebound formula are available, the only patented hangover product on the market is Sob'r-K HangoverStopper.

Steve Russel, vice president of sales and marketing for Sob'r-K HangoverStopper, said his product is based on the old saying that prevention is better than cure.

Russel and his company claim that HangoverStopper pills, which have been available for seven years, stop hangovers before they begin, and the company backs it up with a money-back guarantee.

The pills are available in some bars and clubs, and there are plans to release them to retail locations nationwide, Russel said.

Interested customers can find out more information on the pills at www.hangoverstopper.com on the Web.

Area customers might have to look to the Internet to purchase these remedies, as neither Russo's RX Pharmacy nor Home Care Pharmacy in the E.J. Fennel Building - both in Hagers-town - sell or have plans to sell these remedies.

Regardless of which remedy is used, Cochrane emphasized that hangover remedies should not cause people to use less caution when drinking.

"The absence of hangovers could promote irresponsible drinking," Cochrane said. "But we still encourage people to drink responsibly."

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