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Nurses, staffing are not the problems

August 15, 2004|by Mary Towe
(Page 2 of 2)

Currently, our building prevents us from having the latest in health-care technology. In the new facility, we will have wireless technology that will allow us to monitor our patients' physical state. Just as important, we will be able to monitor their location in the building, getting them to medical services in a more timely fashion. And, we will be able to monitor when beds become open so that they can be made available to incoming patients as soon as possible. Today's nurse wants to work in a modern environment, our new facility will provide that for many years to come.

I agree with Mr. Rollin's basic premise that nurses are at the heart of healt care. It has been our nursing goal and every hospital employee's goal, to provide the optimum in patient care and safety. Now we are forced to do it within the confines of an aging building, whose time is passed. Patient rooms sit empty not because we are short-staffed, but because they no longer meet the fire codes to be designated as permanent patient rooms.

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Our nurses are the best anywhere, but we cannot continue to ask them to work in an environment that challenges them every minute of every day. We must provide them with a hospital structure that enriches their daily work life by supporting them in the art of caring. A new hospital at Robinwood Medical Center will do just that.




Mary Towe is executive director for nursing services at Washington County Hospital.

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