Advertisement

Capito gets closeup of print business

Quad/Graphics in Martinsburg, which prints 8.5 million copies of National Geographic each month, gives a tour to Capito.

Quad/Graphics in Martinsburg, which prints 8.5 million copies of National Geographic each month, gives a tour to Capito.

July 13, 2004|by DAVE McMILLION

charlestown@herald-mail.com

MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Catalog pages and the number of ads being printed at the Quad/Graphics plant are increasing, a sign officials say means the nation's economy is starting to improve.

Plant manager Bill Klingelsmith reported the good news Monday morning during a tour of the plant with U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va.

"It's pretty much following the national pattern," Capito said after her tour of the plant, which is in the Cumbo Yard Industrial Park off W.Va. 9 west of Martinsburg.

Advertisement

Capito said she likes to occasionally tour plants of major employers in the 2nd Congressional District to better understand their operations.

Capito said she believes it is important for lawmakers to become acquainted with major employers because issues voted on by members of U.S. Congress - such as those relating to tax policy - can affect the plants.

With 1,050 people making up its work force, Quad/Graphics is one of the largest private employers in Berkeley County.

The plant prints a variety of catalogs and newspaper inserts, but much of the excitement at Quad/Graphics has centered on its contract to print National Geographic magazine.

The plant prints 8.5 million copies of the magazine in English and Spanish every month, Klingelsmith said.

The August edition of the magazine was being printed Monday and plant officials showed Capito various parts of the production process.

The plant has expanded significantly in terms of space and numbers of workers since it opened in 1997 with 165 workers.

The plant, which runs 24 hours a day, is expected to have a new addition soon and create another 50 jobs by next month, Klingelsmith said.

The plant uses some of the most advanced printing concepts in the world and prides itself on being environmentally friendly in comparison with other printing plants.

"There's not a cleaner plant anywhere," Klingelsmith said.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|