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Borough council hands out grants

March 18, 2004|by RICHARD F. BELISLE

waynesboro@herald-mail.com

WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Streets in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods and downtown revitalization projects will share the biggest chunks of the $200,799 allocation in Community Development Block Grant funds Waynesboro expects to get this year.

The Borough Council approved the division of funds Wednesday night.

Street improvements were earmarked for $60,000, and downtown revitalization will get $60,533 this year, according to the resolution approved by the council.

Housing rehabilitation in the poorer neighborhoods will get $44,926, and $36,320 was dedicated for administration expenses.

In addition, the council said it wants to transfer the remaining $16,144 in the 1999 block grant program to street projects.

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The votes followed the second public hearing on the block grant program.

Councilman Dick George insisted that the door be left open for the council to reconsider spending some of the federal money on other needs.

Wednesday night, attorneys representing Franklin County Legal Services, a two-year-old nonprofit agency based in Chambersburg that provides legal services for poor residents, asked the council for $8,000 in block grant funds for service to Waynesboro residents.

Attorney Philip Cosentino of Chambersburg, Pa., said that since it was created two years ago, Legal Services has opened nearly 700 files countywide, one-fourth of which provided services to Waynesboro residents.

Cosentino is president of Legal Services.

The agency assists low-income residents in civil matters only. It deals in housing problems, child custody and visitation rights cases and problems of elderly residents including wills and guardianship issues, Consentino said.

Legal Services lawyers often go to the homes of their clients to provide services. They have no support staff and do all of their own work, Consentino said.

He said the service would continue in Waynesboro even if the council doesn't come up with the $8,000.

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