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Dog wash a pause that refreshes at Wilson College

November 16, 2003|by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL

bonnieb@herald-mail.com

Big dogs, little dogs, eager dogs and not-so-sure dogs entered the veterinary building at Wilson College Saturday for a bath, blow drying, nail clipping and ear cleaning.

Students in Wilson College's four-year Veterinary Medical Technology course wore brightly-colored smocks and pampered the pets at the Veterinary Medical Technology Club's semi-annual fund-raiser,

Michaela Fry of East Waterford, Pa., a senior in the VMT program, said most of the dogs like the pampering. She said the fund-raiser, which also is held in the spring, gets a lot of support from the community.

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"We're usually busy all day," she said.

By 1:30 p.m. Saturday, with an hour and a half to go in the event, 44 canines had been beautified. The proceeds will help to fund the club's annual trip to a veterinary school, Fry said.

Tina Roles, kennel manager and professor of VMT studies, said 60 freshmen came into the program this year, for a total VMT enrollment of about 180.

"The students get the most exposure to dogs and cats, but we try to give them exposure to everything - lab animals, small and large animals," she said.

Students learn to assist the two staff veterinarians with spay, neuter and other operations in the two surgical suites. Sheep, cows and horses live on a farm on the Wilson campus. Nina, a brindled boxer owned by Laura Norris of Hagerstown, got a bath in the stainless steel dog tub with help from Rachel Douglas, a VMT junior who lives in Chambersburg.

Senior Andrea Shultz held a Jack Russell terrier named Little still on a table while classmate Stephanie Burgess, a junior from Erie, Pa., clipped his toenails. Shultz, of Reading, Pa., works at a Reading-area veterinary clinic during summers and vacations, and plans to work there full time after graduation. She did an internship at a zoo in Louisville, Ky.

"There are so many opportunities for this field," she said. "You can be a manager, do lab work, be a groomer."

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