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Summer over? Not quite

August 24, 2003|by Chris Copley

chrisc@herald-mail.com

Days are shorter and summer is winding down. But weather is still warm and the outdoors beckons. With Labor Day just a week away, how do you want to spend your last long weekend of summer?

There are nearby options:

  • Early Maryland history - Historic St. Mary's City, at St. Mary's College, five miles south of Lexington Park, Md., is an early American archaeologist's dream. The first state capital of the Colony of Maryland, the site remains largely undisturbed by modern development. A village of recreated homes, shops, churches and public buildings is open to visitors with costumed interpreters presenting historical information. In the nearby Potomac River is anchored a replica of the Dove, the ship that brought Lord Calvert and 140 settlers to St. Mary's City, the third permanent European settlement in the New World, in 1634. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Closed Labor Day. Admission is $7.50 for adults, $6 for seniors and students and $3.50 for ages 6 to 12. Call 1-800-762-1634.

  • Washington was here - Natural Bridge, Va. The 200-foot-tall limestone arch has enchanted visitors for centuries. It was first surveyed by a young George Washington, who carved his initials in the arch. A popular destination for its natural beauty in the early 1800s, Natural Bridge is now part of a cluster of tourist attractions, including a wax museum, a deep cave, a toy museum and a monster museum. Admission to the bridge is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Other attractions charge additional admission. Natural Bridge, Va. Take Interstate 81 to Exit 180. Call 1-800-533-1410, or go to www.naturalbridgeva.com on the Web.

  • African-American man of science - Benjamin Banneker was a self-educated, free black mathmatician and astronomer who helped survey the District of Columbia and also published the first almanac in Maryland. He spent his life at or near his home, now a museum, the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum, near Ellicott City, Md. This 142-acre park features exhibits on natural history and early American history. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Call 1-410-887-1081, or go to www.thefriendsofbanneker.org on the Web.

  • Suppressing rebellious Scotsmen - A Celtic Festival at Old Bedford Village, Bedford, Pa., presents a bit of Scottish and English history with a re-enactment of the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. Organizers are expecting more than 100 Scottish and English re-enactors in battle regalia. Old Bedford Village is a community of 40 log homes recreating southern Central Pennsylvania life in the 1700s. Admission is $8 for adults, $4 for children; free for ages 6 and younger. Call 1-814-623-1156.

  • Colonial crafts and Civil War music - The 10th Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Colonial Weekend. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 29; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 30 and 31; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 1. Westmoreland Fairgrounds, Greensburg, Pa., 35 miles east of Pittsburgh. More than 200 indoor and outdoor exhibitors; also children's activities, Civil War music, clowns. Admission is $1 to $5; 5 and younger are free.

  • Deep Creek Lake - Maryland's largest lake, at McHenry, Md., features resorts, marinas, tackle shops and other outfitters for outdoors enthusiasts. Call the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce, 1-301-387-4386.

  • Deep Creek Lake State Park, 898 State Park Road in Swanton, Md., is on the shore of Deep Creek Lake. The park caters to camping, fishing and other outdoor activities. The park's Discovery Center interprets the region's natural history; there is also an aviary displaying native birds. Discovery Center is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily through Labor Day. The park is open from 8 a.m. to dusk daily. Call 1-301-387-4111.

  • Swallow Falls State Park, 222 Herrington Lane, Oakland, Md., hosts its annual corn roast and apple butter boil Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $2. The park features three waterfalls, hiking trails and other outdoor facilities. Call 1-301-334-9180.


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