Advertisement

Blast from the past

May 21, 2003

Week of May 18, 1953


North End residents, whose slumbers have been disturbed by a gang of horn-tooting, firecracker-shooting juveniles are planning to take matters in their own hands if Hagerstown City Police can't apprehend the culprits. A Potomac Avenue man complained that the horn-blowing's bad enough, but one neighborhood hotshot serenades his teenage queen around the midnight hour, honking every time he passes her house, then tosses a few firecrackers to augment the horn-blowing.




Regional Game Warden Benjamin F. Phebus Sr. captured a "suspicious looking" black snake yesterday near Thurmont, Md. In three separate 8-inch operations on the snake, Phebus extracted one undigested adult gray squirrel and two young squirrels, swallowed whole. Despite slits in its body, the snake disappeared in the back of the car while being transported. Later, it was found alive between the interior upholstery and a rear fender.




A freak tornado cut a swath across Hogback Ridge near Hancock Sunday, leaving trees a shattered and tangled mass. The funnel-shaped cloud lifted just as it grazed the dwelling occupied by John Fox on top of the ridge. No injuries were reported.

Advertisement
Week of May 18, 1978


Hagerstown's elected leaders informally agreed to a 10 percent hike in water rates last night. The higher rate would hike the average city resident's bill by about 90 cents every three months. Non-city customers can expect an increase of about $1.50 per quarter.




Heavy rains Monday filled basements in the local area, closed three county roads and caused many electrical malfunctions throughout the City of Hagerstown.

Between Friday night and this morning, 5.16 inches of rain was recorded by Boonsboro weather observer J. Howard Beckenbaugh. Normal for the entire month of May is 4.05 inches.




Approximately 20 Hagerstown city policemen joined by some officers' wives began picketing City Hall this morning over contracts talks in what is believed to be the first such action in the city's history.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|