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Letters to the editor 5/13

May 14, 2003

What happened to police/fire support?



To the editor:


What ever happened to White House talk of improved investment in homeland security? Less than two years after 9/11, states are actually cutting emergency personnel, and promised federal money is fading into memory. Perhaps this shift in winds has something to do with the fact that the Bush administration is pushing a massive tax cut that would gut government funding and create massive deficits. And with 6 percent unemployment such massive tax cuts, even in the view of Mr. Greenspan, are not going to produce the jobs needed to improve the economy.

Given a choice between putting money in the pockets of firefighters and other emergency personnel, or in the pockets of those with swollen wallets, I'd opt for the firefighters. I opt for the police men and women who put their lives on the line every day.

Are we dealing with another administration that believes in voodoo economics for the 21st century? While every child is being left behind and the infrastructure of America is decaying and people are losing jobs, we are now trying to rebuild two countries bombed and devastated by war. At the same time we hear the cry "tax cut" - sounds good on paper but in reality the deficit and the cost down the road for Americans will only bring decades of insecurity.

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We may be the greatest military power on earth but there are forces that can undermine even that power. Let's not be so arrogant that we think all of a sudden we have become "masters of the universe" - where is the power of humility in our nation? Tax cuts before Congress supported by members of both parties make no sense at this time within the context of our economic situation. Such tax cuts in the face of great state government deficits will not make the homeland any more secure.

Raymond Moreland
Frederick, Md.




Reese shows calm, reason



To the editor:


I fervently hope that all the people who argued for getting rid of Charley Reese's column have read - thoughtfully read - his column of May 6, "Earth Day is an afterthought, as U.S. forgets its farm roots." (And this goes for your paper's management people and editorial board, too.)

His tone is calm and measured, he deals in facts, and presents his thoughts in a clear, well-organized manner. He suggests what is needed to make the future better than the past, even though he seriously doubts that the earth will produce the kinds of statesmen that are needed.

We should be thankful that he is someone who can accurately present what we all should know and take to heart.

Katherine Sweeny
Hagerstown




Helen Haupt will be missed



To the editor:


The Hagerstown Community College extends our heartfelt sympathies to the family of Helen Haupt, a valued instructor and member of our HCC family.

Helen was an extraordinary teacher. She had a heart of love for her students and for the heritage craft of chair caning.

At this difficult time, our thoughts turn to the more than 20 years of Helen's service to the community and the college. Helen's strength of purpose and love for heritage crafts is representative of what makes our country great - citizens of the community who step forward to carry on traditions that make a difference in the lives of many.

Words cannot express the loss completely. Hagerstown Community College will never be the same without Helen, but we will all certainly be better for having known her.

Anne Myers
HCC Program Coordinator
Hagerstown

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