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Sidewalk studies OK'd by township

The Washington Township Supervisors are looking for help in the coordination of the walkway linking the township and borough.

The Washington Township Supervisors are looking for help in the coordination of the walkway linking the township and borough.

March 18, 2003|by RICHARD BELISLE

waynesboro@herald-mail.com

WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Consultants have until April 10 to submit proposals for studies to the Washington Township Supervisors to help in the township's plan to build a $325,000 walkway linking the township and Borough of Waynesboro.

The supervisors need professional help in getting studies done on wetlands identification, archaeological tests, obtaining permits and overall coordination of the project, Township Manager Michael Christopher said Monday.

The nearly 1-mile-long sidewalk, controversial at times, will begin at Waynesboro Mall and run along the south side of Pa. 16, through Renfrew Park and Museum and end at Welty Road, where pedestrians can then cross Pa. 16 and enter Wayne Heights Mall.

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It took agreements between Washington Township, the Waynesboro Borough Council and Renfrew board members before it got the final go-ahead.

State Sen. Terry Punt, R- Waynesboro, secured $265,000 in grants toward the cost of building the sidewalk. He pushed the project as a safety measure for people who have to face heavy vehicle traffic along that stretch of Pa. 16.

At one point, Punt threatened to pull the grant because of infighting among the agencies involved, and a lack of commitment to the project.

Borough Council members held it up for months while trying to agree on a route for the sidewalk. Only a few feet of the sidewalk will touch borough property.

Renfrew officials balked at the route going through the museum's property, while Washington Township officials supported the project from the beginning.

Many meetings were held, some behind closed doors, before an agreement was finally reached earlier this year.

Christopher had no timetable for when actual construction could begin.

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