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Greencastle may use eminent domain

The rights of way are needed to allow for a $1 million storm drain project aimed at alleviating flooding woes on U.S. 11.

The rights of way are needed to allow for a $1 million storm drain project aimed at alleviating flooding woes on U.S. 11.

February 04, 2003|by RICHARD BELISLE

waynesboro@herald-mail.com

GREENCASTLE, PA. - Four Greencastle property owners will get official notice this week that they will have to give rights of way through their property for a $1 million storm drain project or face it being taken by eminent domain, the Borough Council ruled Monday night.

The project, aimed at eliminating a pond-like problem created during heavy rains on U.S. 11 under a railroad underpass, will require rights of way through nine private properties, Borough Manager Kenneth Myers said.

The council adopted an ordinance Monday authorizing the project that also will upgrade a portion of the borough's existing storm drain system. The same ordinance authorized the borough to seek eminent domain against the four hold-out property owners.

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The council opened bids for the project from three contractors, including two from Franklin County and one from Harrisburg, Pa.

The apparent low bidder was Charles E. Brake Co. Inc. of St. Thomas, Pa., with a bid of $957,327.50. The next lowest bidder was Rogele Inc. of Harrisburg with $1,091,680. D.L. George & Sons of Waynesboro, Pa., came in with a bid of $1,122, 037.

The council opted to go with metal rather than the more durable concrete pipe for the project to save an estimated $200,000 in construction costs.

William E. Green, with Brehm-Lebo Engineering Inc. of Chambersburg, Pa., the engineer for the project, said that while the metal pipe is approved for use by PennDOT, it lacks the strength of concrete. Metal costs less than concrete and is faster and cheaper to install, he said.

Greencastle has been plagued for years with the heavy water that collects under the railroad underpass, often deep enough to prevent traffic from going through.

The new storm drain system will collect water from areas south and east of the underpass, including that which drains off the Greencastle-Antrim School District property, and divert it into the new system that eventually will dump it into Spring Run, a tributary of Conococheague Creek.

The project also calls for widening about 1,100 feet of Spring Run to hold the added water that the new system will dump into it, Green said.

Construction is expected to get under way in early March, with completion scheduled for Oct. 31. The contract has penalties of $1,000 a day for every day after that date that the project isn't finished.

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