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High waters flood Pa. animal rescue shelter

Three animals at Greener Pastures died last week when the Conococheague Creek

Three animals at Greener Pastures died last week when the Conococheague Creek

January 07, 2003|by RICHARD BELISLE

waynesboro@herald-mail.com

MARION, Pa. - Bambi was rescued from a barn with about 100 other animals and poultry that had gotten so hungry that they began to eat each other.

Sweet Pea, a mutt, was hit by a car in front of Greener Pastures, an animal rescue shelter on Social Island Road run by Samantha Frey.

Harley was a pot-bellied pig that was sent to the farm when its owner no longer wanted him.

All three animals died last week when the Conococheague Creek jumped its banks and ran over the lower sections of Frey's 10-acre Greener Pastures farm.

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"They were nowhere to be found," Frey said Monday as she looked over the devastation left by the rising creek waters. The creek almost claimed the life of Buddy, a 600-pound boar hog that managed to escape his appointment with a slaughterhouse.

Frey said she couldn't get to the pig because of the high water. "He stood through it with just his snout above the water," she said.

The farm and its 142-year-old brick farmhouse is populated with turkeys, sheep, geese, ducks, burrows, horses, pigs, goats and a handful of dogs. They were rescued from slaughter houses, abusive environments or just dropped off like Sweet Pea was before he was run over.

On Monday afternoon, a woman stopped by and asked Frey if she could take in a 2-year-old Dalmatian whose owner has cancer.

When high waters hit following last week's snow and heavy rain, a half-dozen friends and volunteers rushed to the farm at Frey's request to help in her frantic attempt to save the animals from drowning.

"We brought the horses up and tied them to trees. We started carrying the animals to high ground, but we lost some. We watched as the goat and pig were swept downstream," she said.

There was also some monetary loss when her store of winter hay was swept away. "I don't know how I can afford to replace it now," she said.

Frey has been running her rescue farm since 2000, mostly from her own pocket and what she can collect in donations of animal food and cash.

She can be reached at 717-375-2644.

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