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New director named for county Gaming Commission

December 23, 2002|by TARA REILLY

tarar@herald-mail.com

WASHINGTON COUNTY - Washington County's new gaming director joked last week that the biggest challenge of his job would be to figure out how to use the county's phone system.

Daniel DiVito, a native of Oak Park, Ill., a suburb of Chicago, was hired by the County Commissioners two weeks ago. His first day on the job was last Monday and he will earn $37,780 a year.

He left a job as the personnel and safety director for Turner Transportation Group to become the gaming director.

On a serious note, DiVito, 52, said he hopes to make the office more efficient and work cooperatively with the seven-member Washington County Gaming Commission.

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"I really think they have a hard job," DiVito said. "One of the toughest is prioritizing the needs of all these charities."

The Gaming Commission was created in 1995 to distribute money taxed on the profits of tip jars, a game in which gamblers purchase peel-off tickets in hopes of winning hundreds of dollars.

The tickets are contained in large jars.

Clubs that participate in tip jars give 15 percent of their profits to the Gaming Commission, which distributes the money to various nonprofit organizations, as mandated by state law.

DiVito said his background in business and politics attracted him to the job.

He graduated from Arizona State University with a degree in business and started a construction company in Chicago before moving to Washington County in the late 1980s.

While here, he worked for former Del. Bruce Poole and also worked as a political consultant for the secretary of state's office in the early 1990s. He also opened his own business, Century Systems in Waterford, Va., in which he worked with major contract vendors and suppliers before taking the job with Turner Transportation in Hagerstown.

He said he moved back to Hagerstown because he likes the area for its friendly residents, and because he wanted to be closer to his daughter and four grandchildren.

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