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Ex-Councilman Irvin Bloom dies

After working for the city's Department of Revenue and Finance for 38 years, Irvin Keedy Bloom served on the city council from 1

After working for the city's Department of Revenue and Finance for 38 years, Irvin Keedy Bloom served on the city council from 1

November 19, 2002

HAGERSTOWN - A former Hagerstown City Councilman, described by colleagues as a thoughtful, considerate gentleman, has died.

Irvin Keedy Bloom, 94, died Saturday at Fahrney-Keedy Home in Boonsboro, where he has lived for about five years, former Mayor Pat Paddock said. Paddock was mayor when Bloom was on the council, said.

"He represented his people well. He was a gentleman," former Councilman Ira Kauffman said. "We lost a good person."

Bloom served two terms as Hagerstown's Ward Five councilman, from 1973 to 1981. He did not seek re-election in 1981.

"He was a totally 100 percent genuine person for everybody. You know if you had a good project you could count on Irv," former Councilman Larry Vaughn said.

While Bloom represented the North End, he still supported and helped worthwhile projects elsewhere in the city, Vaughn said.

"He did not play games with his votes," Vaughn said.

Vaughn and Kauffman were on the council with Bloom.

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Bloom worked for the City of Hagerstown's Department of Revenue and Finance for 38 years, retiring in 1971 as acting tax collector and treasurer.

The resulting knowledge and skills made him a better councilman, Vaughn said.

"He was a very considerate gentleman, a great guy," Paddock said. He looked out for the common person, he said.

Mayor William M. Breichner, who was city water superintendent when Bloom was a councilman, said Bloom was always polite and nice.

"I never heard him get angry," he said.

Bloom also owned and helped run the Arlington Store, a grocery store at Mulberry and Antietam streets, from 1951 to 1961.

The word "gentleman" was used by several colleagues to describe him.

Asked to elaborate, Vaughn said, "It was his manner. You would have to compare him to an English gentleman who always opened the door for a lady.

"You'll never replace him."

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