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Inflammation in bloodstream is twice as bad for the heart as ch

November 15, 2002

BOSTON (AP) - Despite their seemingly healthy cholesterol levels, new research shows many people are at high risk of heart attacks because of painless inflammation in the bloodstream.

The inflammation comes from many sources and triggers heart attacks by weakening the walls of blood vessels, making fatty buildups burst. A large study published today concludes it is twice as likely as high cholesterol to trigger heart attacks.

Over the past five years, research by Dr. Paul Ridker of Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital has built the case for the "inflammation hypothesis." With his latest study, many believe the evidence is overwhelming that inflammation is a central factor in cardiovascular disease, by far the world's biggest killer.

"I don't think it's a hypothesis anymore. It's proven," said Dr. Eric Topol, chief of cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic.

Inflammation can be measured with a test that checks for C-reactive protein, or CRP, a chemical necessary for fighting injury and infection. The test typically costs between $25 and $50.

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Diet and exercise can lower CRP dramatically. Cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins also reduce CRP, as do aspirin and some other medicines.

Doctors believe the condition often begins when the fatty buildups that line the blood vessels become inflamed as white blood cells invade in a misguided defense attempt. Fat cells are also known to turn out these inflammatory proteins. Other possible triggers include high blood pressure, smoking and lingering infections, such as chronic gum disease.

Ridker's study says for the first time what level of CRP should be considered worrisome, so doctors can make sense of patients' readings. However, experts are still divided over which patients to test and how to treat them if their CRP readings are high.

Some, such as Dr. Richard Milani of the Ochsner Clinic in New Orleans, recommend a CRP check for almost anyone getting a cholesterol test. "If I have enough concern to check a patient's cholesterol, it seems naive not to include an inexpensive test that would give me even more information," he said.

Though the study involved only women, Ridker said he is confident the findings apply to men as well.

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