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Residents dispose of rubber as part of Tire Amnesty Day

More than 2,100 tires were dropped off Saturday at Forty West Landfill.

More than 2,100 tires were dropped off Saturday at Forty West Landfill.

September 30, 2002|by RICHARD BELISLE

waynesboro@herald-mail.com

More than 2,100 old tires were dropped off at Forty West Landfill Saturday, one of seven drop-off places open to residents in a countywide effort to eliminate mosquito breeding places in the wake of the West Nile virus scare.

The project, called Tire Amnesty Day, was Washington County's contribution in the fight against West Nile virus that is being detected around much of the United States. The disease can be fatal.

Old tires lying around tend to collect water and provide excellent breeding spots for mosquitoes, which carry the disease.

Harvey Hoch, coordinator of the county's recycling program, said enough tires were collected Saturday to fill a 100-cubic-yard trailer.

"We estimate that we'll get enough to fill three more trailers," Hoch said.

Total results of the collection effort won't be known until later in the week when all the drop-off places report in, he said.

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Hoch said 460 vehicles showed up with tires at the 40 West Landfill Saturday. Another 200 each were reported at the county highway department shops on Greensburg Road, Keedysville and Big Pool.

The Washington County Health Department set up drop-off places at the county's three high schools Saturday, Hoch said. He had no information on the number of tires dropped off at the schools.

The collection effort was sponsored by the Maryland Department of the Environment and the Washington County Solid Waste Department.

A similar effort last year netted 176 tons of old tires. This is the county's fourth Tire Amnesty Day, Hoch has said.

The tires are trucked to a state-certified incinerator, he said.

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