Advertisement

Plaque marks the spot

Indian path cited in City Park sign

Indian path cited in City Park sign

August 11, 2002|by RICHARD BELISLE

waynesboro@herald-mail.com

Hagerstown will represent Maryland with a historic marker honoring a trail that first carried animals then Native Americans and later pioneers from the Great Lakes to Georgia as one of the routes that paved the way to the nation's early development.

A bronze plaque marking the "Great Indian Warrior/trading Path" was unveiled in a brief ceremony Saturday afternoon on the grounds of the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts.

The plaque was paid for by the 7,000-member National Society Daughters of the American Colonists. The plaque, one of 23 being installed in states the trail crossed, cost about $1,000, said Mary Ann Groome Hepler, national president of the organization.

Advertisement

The society is the third largest women's genealogical organization in the country, Hepler said. Lucy Blocker, head of the Maryland chapter, said it has about 100 members.

A similar plaque will be placed at the intersection of U.S. 11 and Edwin Miller Boulevard in Martinsburg, W.Va., Monday to commemorate the trail's route through the Mountain State, Hepler said.

A plaque was placed earlier this year in York, Pa., to note where the path crossed in that state.

The project was created to promote history, patriotism and education, Hepler said.

"When the children come to visit this beautiful museum they can take a moment to read the plaque and learn about our history," she said.

Hagerstown Mayor William M. Breichner welcomed the Society to the city and Jean Woods, museum director, accepted the plaque on behalf of the museum.

The plaque says in part that the trail was "the most heavily traveled road in Colonial America linking the Great Lakes to Augusta, Ga."

It also said the great Philadelphia wagon road passed through Hagerstown and crossed the Potomac River at Evans Watkins ferry.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|