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Wivell pulls out of delegate race

June 27, 2002|by SCOTT BUTKI

scottb@herald-mail.com

Washington County Commissioner William J. Wivell has dropped out of the state House of Delegates race and intends to seek re-election as a commissioner, he said Wednesday.

His decision to change races is the result of a new legislative redistricting plan unveiled Friday by the Maryland Court of Appeals, Wivell said.

Wivell, 37, a Republican, said he probably will file for the commissioners race today. The filing deadline is Monday.

In mid-March, Wivell filed to run for the state delegate seat in District 2A. The District 2A seat is held by Del. Robert McKee, R-Washington, but new district boundaries drawn by Gov. Parris Glendening would have put McKee's home in neighboring District 2B.

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Those boundaries were thrown out by the court earlier this month.

Wivell had said he would drop out of the delegate race if new boundaries pitted him against an incumbent. The boundaries released Friday place McKee in his original district, meaning the two would have been primary election opponents.

"Bob McKee does a pretty good job representing the interests of the taxpayers of Washington County" and he does not want to run against him, Wivell said.

State Board of Elections officials confirmed Wednesday that Wivell had withdrawn from the race.

Wivell, a lifelong Smithsburg resident, is an accountant with Allegheny Energy.

Wivell was elected a Washington County Commissioner in 1998. As a commissioner, he has focused on controlling spending and fighting tax increases, he said. If re-elected, he said, he would continue with that fiscally conservative approach.

Wivell said he also would continue to focus on water and sewer issues and the Forty West Landfill.

The county needs to work to attract high-paying technology jobs to the area, he said.

Wivell is on the Water and Sewer Advisory Commission, the Solid Waste Advisory Commission, the Department of Social Services Advisory Board and the PenMar Board of Directors.

The commissioner job will pay $30,000 a year.

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