Advertisement

College and Career Corner

Today's educational skills reflect tomorrow's salaries

Today's educational skills reflect tomorrow's salaries

May 20, 2002|BY ROSE RENNEKAMP

Sometimes it's hard to impress upon our teenagers the importance of taking challenging courses.

If your teens are anything like their peers, when money is "on the table," their interest usually perks up.

Recent research studies show that high skills translate into high pay in the workplace. Taking challenging course work is an important way to invest in yourself.

Researchers at ACT Inc. have found that the salary a student can expect is strongly related to skills. Occupations that have higher requirements for mathematics, locating information and reading skills pay higher entry-level salaries.

In the workplace, different jobs require different skills. One system of measuring skill levels is WorkKeys, used in many businesses and school systems throughout the country.

Advertisement

WorkKeys skill levels are ranked from 1 to 7. If you take a WorkKeys test in applied mathematics and discover you are a level 3, you will be able to handle simple math problems. If you are at a level 7, you can solve much more complex problems.

Salaries for various skill levels indicate that occupations requiring a level 7 in applied mathematics offered entry-level salaries 75 percent higher per year than those requiring level 3 math skills.

The message to high school students: Study hard and build your skills! Even after you fulfill the minimum high school or college entry requirements - keep challenging yourself and keep working on your skills.

Education is worthwhile for its own sake, and when it raises employability skill levels, it also has a potential dollar payoff.

Rose Rennekamp is the vice president of communications for ACT Inc. For more college and career planning information, visit www.act.org. Have a question? E-mail Rose at AskRose@act.org.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|