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letters 4/16

April 16, 2002

Constitution is blind to religion

To the editor:

Mr. S. Windle's letter which appeared on April 6 in The Herald-Mail should be noted as intolerance in its excellence. He should be reminded that it is not the tolerance that allows pornography to be sold openly in the stores, but the freedom of expression given by our Constitution.

We must be well advised to remember that when the Ten Commandments say "love your neighbor" or "you shall not kill," it does not specify a person's religion. The Rev. Stevenson should be commended for his stand towards people with different faiths, and certainly he deserves an apology.

S.V. Yumlu

Hagerstown




Thanks for being honest

To the editor:

Someone who is totally anonymous to me truly brightened my day on Friday, April 5. While running a series of errands with my two young sons, I made a stop at the Post Office on Northern Avenue to buy some stamps and mail a letter at about 11:15 a.m. After paying for the stamps with a check I paused at the lobby counter on the way out to make the necessary notations in my checkbook register. Somehow after gathering my boys, my receipt and my checkbook to head out to my car, I mistakenly left the roll of stamps on the counter. It wasn't until a few hours later that I realized my oversight.

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Although not expecting a positive result, I decided to call the Post Office just on the remote chance that someone had found the stamps and turned them into one of the employees. I had basically accepted that I had made a $34 absent- minded mistake, but to my surprise the stamps had been turned in. When I went by to pick up the stamps the Post Office employees said an elderly gentleman - who wasn't a "regular" and that they weren't familiar with - turned them in without identifying himself. I asked the employees, if they were to see this man again, to express to him how much I appreciated his act of kindness.

In a backup attempt to express my gratitude, I'm writing this in hopes that by chance this "Good Samaritan" will see this letter. Sir, if you are reading this, please know that your random act of honesty and kindness truly made my day.

Mike Spinnler

Hagerstown




Name a diamond for Dave Phillips

To the editor:

On Feb. 7, a man passed away who had a tremendous effect on hundreds of local young men. Dave Phillips was that man. He and a few others were the founders of American Legion Baseball in Washington County.

Thirty-plus years have passed and because of Dave's efforts, Funkstown Legion's Baseball program is known as one of the best programs in the state. His managing records will probably never be equaled. In 14 seasons at the helm, he accumulated a remarkable 85 percent winning record. He won 11 district titles and brought three state championships home. Dave's greatest accomplishments will never show statistically in a record book, but will remain in the hearts and characters of all who had the privilege of playing for him.

Dave learned early in his career that young men ages 16 -19 have much more on their minds than baseball. This is what made Dave such a special coach. He could sort out all the distractions that dominate a teenager's life and bring the focus to baseball. He handled every player differently and respected his individuality. In the years when everyone has the "worst parents in the world," Dave would listen to his players' problems and offer wise advice.

While constantly teaching the game of baseball, Dave wanted the player's opinion as well. His players learned to love and respect baseball for just what it is: a game. Rarely did Dave show emotion on the field nor did he disgrace a player in public. His silent, calm demeanor brought a team together with a magic that most coaches would never understand. There was never deception to accomplish a goal, just blue collar work ethics that proved you'll get out of anything what you put into it.

For many players, those summers in Legion baseball will remain as the greatest memories in our lives. Dave was simply a winner who offered a summer home to do what players loved with a coach who loved the game as much as his players.

Who more deserves a place in the Washington County Hall of Fame? Has any coach in our area ever duplicated his feats? I truly believe that through Funkstown Legion's baseball program and Dave Phillips' coaching, all who played for him became better individuals. He brought pride and honor to Funkstown Legion and the town of Funkstown.

Funkhouser Park, Legion Baseball and Dave Phillips will forever be synonymous. Wouldn't it be a tremendous and well-earned honor to this man to have the baseball diamond in Funkhouser Park named for him? In his players' minds, it will always be "his" park.

Rick Knepper

Boonsboro

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