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Letters to the Editor 1/31

January 31, 2002

Letters to the Editor 1/31



There are others more in need



To the editor:

Excuse me, but why does anyone feel the need to help an executive of a development company, who lost all possessions in a fire that was caused by faulty electrical work?

Yes, many personal possessions that can never be replaced were lost. Much sentiment went up in smoke. And, for that I feel truly sorry for the Crampton family.

However, consider the fact that there was over 6,000 square feet of living space in this structure. I'd be willing to bet my next paycheck that there are plenty of families in this area who live in less than 20 percent of that space. I'd also bet that each of these families would be able to tell you off the top of their head (without an inventory list from the insurance company), exactly what possessions they lost, had this been their tragedy.

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Yes, all citizens in this land of opportunity, do have the same chance to obtain a "million dollar home" standard of living, if they would work hard and diligently. But, mathematically speaking, it's few who actually reach this level.

Instead of a "drive begun to replace Crampton household items" (Herald-Mail, Jan. 15), a better idea would be to start a drive to help those of us Washington Countians whose goal of "adequate housing and amenities" has never quite been met, ever. I would suggest a registry of those in need at K-Mart, The Dollar Store, and Value City Furniture.

Better yet, maybe the new "homeless" Mr. Crampton could see to it that whatever is donated to him is distributed to those truly in need. Or maybe, he could match the dollar value of the donations, to be earmarked for a year-round, staffed, homeless shelter.

Now that Crampton has experienced such a personal tragedy, he may also have the words it takes to persuade his fellow affluent contractors to do the same.

Rebecca Cline
Hagerstown




A kitty that breeds...



To the editor:

Just a quick note to remind everyone that the days are getting longer and all the kittens that were born last year are old enough to be coming into season.

If you have not already gotten your female kittens spayed, now is the time to do it. Cats will stay in heat until they are bred. They will only come out of season for a short time and then it will start all over.

Not only will they give you a litter of kittens, but a well-fed queen will give you several litters between March and August. We have had a very mild winter, and now the days are getting longer. Both of these factors will contribute to the kitten population boom that inevitably will end in thousands of kittens being killed, and their only crime will be being born into a world where there simply are not enough homes.

Love your cat enough to spay her now, the only thing worse than letting her breed, is the torture she will go through, and put you through if she is not bred. The Washington County spay/neuter program is available to residents of Washington County. Call the SPCA at (301) 733-2060 and get your spay/neuter certificate today.

Angie Harsh
Hagerstown




To control a Rottweiler



To the editor:

I recently had the displeasure of reading in The Herald-Mail that the animal control officers in Berkeley County have gotten an ammunition upgrade.

The animal control officers can now use a type of ammunition called Magsafe, instead of their former use of birdshot. In the recent article, the officers said that "they had tried to control a Rottweiler" and that "the birdshot did not slow up that dog at all." The article also stated that some animal control officers had asked to use their own guns and were denied.

While, I understand that some dogs can be safety hazards, I also have some real concerns. The article didn't state the circumstances under which this Rottweiler became out of control, or any of the specifics of the case. I know nothing about the particular dog mentioned, and my comments are not specifically regarding that dog. Many dogs will try to protect their owners, and the property that they reside on. Also, many dogs are known as "fear biters."

Many dogs bark at noises, especially in a rural area, where they are not used to strangers. It would be a shame that in the future a loving family dog could be killed, possibly in its own yard, although it is not normally mean-natured.

Possibly, the voters should have some say as to how their tax dollars are spent. Yes, in Berkeley County, we do pay a yearly dog tax. And, in Berkeley County, we do not have the scanners - computer chips implanted in the dog at owners' expense - used to help owners find their dogs.

Perhaps there could be an implementation of some other way of "controlling" dogs. Most of us have seen other methods used on TV programs dealing with wild and dangerous animals, so why not our own companion animals? Does it not make more sense to try to subdue a dog, rather than possibly killing it first?

J. Louise McCormick
Falling Waters, W.Va.




Who cared for Christian workers?



To the editor:

It is always instructive to read today's complaints in terms of yesterday's news. So when we learn that the "Taliban prisoners (are])hungry, cold (Dec. 24, Morning Herald, page B7)," we should stop and think; isn't that how the two Christian hostages described conditions earlier this year during their Kabul confinement and transfer to Kandahar?

And aren't these the same Taliban who said on Feb. 11, 1999, that they "had imposed severe restrictions on terrorism suspect Osama bin Laden, after refusing U.S. demands that he be extradited." The Taliban statement said the Saudi-born millionaire "had been deprived of all means to communicate with the outside world and restrictions had been placed on who he could meet (Washington Post, page A32)."

Sounds like famous last words to me. Are they hoisted by their own petard? Anyone else feel sympathy for Taliban prisoners?

Douglas Scott Arey
MCIH 130196 A-1-A-20
Hagerstown

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