Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsGod

Letters to the Editor 5/19

May 21, 2001

Letters to the Editor 5/19



Two who served Christ



To the editor:

Two people I greatly admired, both of whom have since gone to be with Christ by way of the grave, were Corrie ten Boom and Richard Wurmbrand.

Corrie and her family hid Jews from the Nazis during WWII. A book about her experiences, "The Hiding Place," became a bestseller and a major movie by the same name was made.

Pastor Richard Wurmbrand was imprisoned and tortured by the communists for almost 15 years for telling others about Christ. Several times he was near death, but God preserved his life and he came to this country and founded a ministry called "Jesus to the Communist World," now renamed "Voice Of The Martyrs."

Advertisement

Their toll-free number is 1-800-747-0085. They have many valuable resources regarding the persecution of Christian believers in many countries, and what people of faith can do in this country to assist them in their plight.

I strongly believe it is not enough for us in America to exercise our religious and civic freedoms, not enough even to say "thank you" to God for these freedoms: If we are truly thankful and have any sense of decency and a desire to "love your neighbor," I hope this information is a blessing to you and yours, and that you obtain the same inspiration to serve God even more that I received from reading about these wonderful Christians, who risked (as many in China, Sudan, etc. still do) everything to serve their maker.

Though persecuted and beaten beyond belief, they were virtuous in ways we have never known. I am a Christian and I love the Lord, but have not paid nearly the price that these have to be faithful to him.

Howard Rudolph

Hagerstown




Mother is always with me



To the editor:

My first recollection of being a member of our society was at approximately age 3. I remember this because I slept in the corner of my mother's bedroom in a large, oversized crib. Although I prevailed on her because the lights were out, to leave the hall lights on.

My mother came to America from Liverpool, England. She said she would never forget seeing the Statue of Liberty for the first time and reading the inscription "Give me your tired your poor, hungering to be free."

My mother drove an ambulance during World War I and was assigned to pick bodies up along the way. Nothing was too much for this woman. The youngest of 13 children, her mother was blind and her father abandoned them early on.

My mother worked very hard as a chambermaid in the dormitories of Harvard University in Cambridge Massachusetts.

President John F. Kennedy was a student at the time and he called my mother by her first name, May. John like to play jokes on my mother. He bought things from a store called Jack and Jill's Joke Shop. He would play jokes on my mom and roll over on the floor with laughter.

My mother was very sad when he was assassinated. She felt as though she had lost a son.

My mother is no longer with me, but her indomitable spirit will be with me always.

Peggy Reynolds

Hagerstown




Reconsider these cases



To the editor:

Leonard Pitts has been writing some outstanding columns, and his of May 7 compels me to pray President Bush will overturn the Joint Chiefs Chairman, since it is clear that Henry Johnson deserves the Medal of Honor.

What irony - former Sen. Bob Kerrey won't be subject to any second guessing about whether his nomination for the Bronze Star followed proper procedure; and Henry Johnson need not worry about any second guessing as to whether racism in the segregated era of the 1910s has any effect in the refusal to recognize Johnson with the Medal of Honor, even as France recognized him with their highest honor, the Croix de Guerre!

Both cases need to be reconsidered, and the tragic irony is the unlikelihood in either case!

Dougas Scott Arey

MCIH #130196 A-1-A-20

Hagerstown




Who shot J.E.B.?



To the editor:

The late great General J.E.B. Stuart "The Last Cavalier" was not shot by one of his own men, but, by one of those other people, as General Robert E. Lee called them.

It was a dismounted horsemen by the rank Private John Huff, on May 11, 1864 at Yellow Tavern. Unless it was those other people's covert operations.

Lynden Ford Moser

Hagerstown

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|